Recombivax

Recombivax Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Engerix-B, Engerix-B Pediatric, Recombivax HB Adult, Recombivax HB Dialysis Formulation, Recombivax HB Pediatric/Adolescent

Generic Name: hepatitis B vaccine (Pronunciation: HEP a TYE tis)

What is hepatitis B vaccine (Recombivax)?

Hepatitis B is a disease of the liver that is spread through blood or bodily fluids, sexual contact or sharing IV drug needles with an infected person, or during childbirth when a baby is born to a mother who is infected. Hepatitis causes inflammation of the liver, vomiting, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Hepatitis can lead to liver cancer, cirrhosis, or death.

The hepatitis B vaccine is used to help prevent this disease.

This vaccine works by exposing you to a small amount of the virus, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all adults and children who are at risk of getting hepatitis B. Risk factors include: having more than one sex partner in 6 months; being a homosexual male; having sexual contact with infected people; having cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis C; using intravenous (IV) drugs; being on dialysis or receiving blood transfusions; working in healthcare or public safety and being exposed to infected blood or body fluids; being in the military or traveling to high-risk areas; and living with a person who has chronic hepatitis B infection.

Like any vaccine, the hepatitis B vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.

What are the possible side effects of this vaccine (Recombivax)?

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shots caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with hepatitis B is much more dangerous to your health than receiving the vaccine to protect against it. Like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • fever, sore throat, and headache with a severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash;
  • fussiness, irritability, crying for an hour or longer;
  • fast or pounding heartbeats; or
  • easy bruising or bleeding.

Less serious side effects include:

  • redness, pain, swelling, or a lump where the shot was given;
  • headache, dizziness;
  • low fever;
  • joint pain, body aches;
  • tired feeling; or
  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Recombivax (hepatitis b vaccine (recombinant)) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about this vaccine (Recombivax)?

Hepatitis B vaccine will not protect you against infection with hepatitis A, C, and E, or other viruses that affect the liver. It will also not protect you from hepatitis B if you are already infected with the virus, even if you do not yet show symptoms.

Vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all adults and children who are at risk of getting hepatitis B. Risk factors include: having more than one sex partner in 6 months; being a homosexual male; having sexual contact with infected people; having cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis C; using intravenous (IV) drugs; being on dialysis or receiving blood transfusions; working in healthcare or public safety and being exposed to infected blood or body fluids; being in the military or traveling to high-risk areas; and living with a person who has chronic hepatitis B infection.

The hepatitis B vaccine is given in a series of shots. The booster shots are sometimes given 1 month and 6 months after the first shot. If you have a high risk of hepatitis B infection, you may be given an additional booster 2 months after the first shot.

Your individual booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by the health department of the state you live in.

Be sure you receive all recommended doses of this vaccine. If you do not receive the full series of vaccines, you may not be fully protected against the disease.

You can still receive a vaccine if you have a cold or fever. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Keep track of any and all side effects you have after receiving this vaccine. When you receive a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shots caused any side effects.

Becoming infected with hepatitis B is much more dangerous to your health than receiving the vaccine to protect against it. Like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects, but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

Side Effects Centers
A A A

Recombivax - User Reviews

Recombivax User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Recombivax sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Women's Health

Find out what women really need.