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Root Canal (cont.)

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What kind of problems or complications may occur after getting a root canal?

Since a tooth that has had a root canal has been hollowed out to a certain degree, it is more prone to fracture. Getting a crown placed on the tooth will almost completely prevent this, but it can still happen. Sometimes there may have been an undetected crack at the time the root canal was performed, and the tooth may need to be extracted even though the tooth was treated with a perfect root canal.

In excessively curved roots, a file could break off inside the canal. Sometimes these files can be retrieved, but many times they cannot. If this happens, the tooth will be filled to the level of the file and monitored closely. If it was thoroughly cleaned before the file broke, the tooth may be unaffected. If not, it may need a surgical procedure to finish the root canal treatment.

A root canal can become re-infected if the restoration has leaked, the patient doesn't have good oral hygiene, or because the sealing materials have degraded or broken down over time. Sometimes there may be more than the normal number of root canals in a tooth and the treating dentist may have missed the extra canal. This canal will still have infected tissue in it and will need to be cleaned out and filled. If a root canal has become re-infected, it can usually be retreated with another root canal. In this procedure, the endodontist will simply remove the gutta percha and sealing material through the opening in the tooth, clean out the canals and any additional canals, and seal them back up again. A retreatment is likely to be done in two visits. Sometimes a retreatment isn't possible and a tooth will need to have a more surgical procedure to be saved. In this case, an endodontist may perform an apicoectomy which involves accessing the root of the tooth through an incision made in the gums and bone. The tip of the root may be cut off and the area is cleaned and sealed from the end of the root.

There have been claims that leaving a tooth treated with a root canal inside the mouth causes a variety of health problems, including cancer. These claims are based on an assumption that root canal treatment can never fully get rid of the infected tissue and tooth structure and that keeping infected tissue inside the mouth induces a response by the body that leads to health problems. Such claims are not based on sound scientific evidence and rely on coincidence and correlation for substantiation. Often, such claims are used to promote expensive alternatives to traditional dental treatments that result in profit for those making the claims. There is more evidence to refute such claims than to support them. Persons who believe they may need a root canal should seek out a competent licensed dentist whom they can trust to diagnose disease and deliver evidence-based dental treatment, including root canal treatment.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/9/2013

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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/root_canal/article.htm

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