September 3, 2015
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Roseola (cont.)

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How high can the fever go with roseola?

The fever can be quite high. The fever averages 103.5 F (39.7 C), but it can go up as high as 106 F (41.2 C).

What is the treatment for the fever of roseola?

If the fever is not causing the child to be uncomfortable, the fever need not be treated. It is not necessary to awaken the child to treat a fever unless instructed to do so by a health-care professional.

If someone wants to treat the fever, acetaminophen (Tylenol and others) can be used. The dosage interval is every four hours. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, and others) may be used in lieu of acetaminophen on an every six-hour basis. Both families of medication are equally effective in lowering a child's fever. There is no medical benefit alternating acetaminophen with ibuprofen. Aspirin should never be used for fever in children or adolescents.

A child with a fever should be kept comfortable and not be overdressed. Overdressing can cause the temperature to go higher. Bathing with tepid water (85 F or 29.5 C) may help bring down a fever. If a child develops shivering during the bath, the temperature of the bath water should be raised. Never sponge a child (or an adult) with alcohol; the alcohol fumes may be inhaled, causing many problems.

Can the fever cause a seizure?

Yes. The sudden and rapid rise in temperature elevation may trigger a seizure (a convulsion). Febrile seizures (convulsions due to fever) are common (3%) in children between 18 months to 3 years of age. They occur in 5%-35% of children with roseola.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/16/2015

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/roseola/article.htm

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