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Rotarix

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Rotarix

Rotarix

Rotarix Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving rotavirus oral vaccine (Rotarix)?

Your child should not receive this vaccine if he or she has ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction to a rotavirus oral vaccine, or if the child has severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID).

If your child has any of these other conditions, this vaccine may need to be postponed or not given at all:

  • HIV or AIDS;
  • a current stomach illness or diarrhea;
  • a congenital stomach disorder or recent stomach surgery;
  • leukemia or other blood disease;
  • if the child is allergic to latex rubber; or
  • if the child has recently received a blood transfusion.

Rotavirus oral vaccine may cause intussusception in some people. Intussusception is when a section of the intestine folds over into itself, creating an obstruction in the bowel. Call your doctor as soon as possible if your child has stomach pain or bloating, vomiting (especially if it is golden-brown to green in color), bloody stools, grunting or excessive crying, and eventually weakness and shallow breathing.

Your child can still receive a vaccine if he or she has a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until the child gets better before receiving this vaccine.

Tell the doctor if anyone living with or caring for the child has cancer or a weak immune system, or is receiving treatments that can weaken the immune system (such as radiation, chemotherapy, or steroids).

How is rotavirus oral vaccine given (Rotarix)?

Your child will receive this vaccine in a clinic, hospital, or doctor's office. The rotavirus oral vaccine is given as an oral (by mouth) liquid.

The RotaTeq brand of rotavirus oral vaccine is given in a series of 3 doses. The first dose is usually given when the child is 6 to 12 weeks old. The booster doses are then given at 4-week to 10-week intervals before the child reaches 32 weeks of age.

The Rotarix brand of rotavirus oral vaccine is given in a series of 2 doses. The first dose is usually given when the child is 6 weeks old. The second dose is then given at least 4 weeks after the first dose, but before the child reaches 24 weeks of age.

Your child's booster schedule may be different from these guidelines. Follow your doctor's instructions or the schedule recommended by your local health department.

Tell your doctor if your child spits up or vomits within 1 or 2 hours after receiving rotavirus oral vaccine. The child may need to receive a replacement dose to be fully protected from rotavirus.

Always wash your hands after handling the diapers of a child who has been given the rotavirus oral vaccine. Small amounts of the virus may be passed in the child's stool and could possibly infect others who come into contact with the child's stool.

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