February 23, 2017
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Scars

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Scars facts

  • Scars occur when tissues have been significantly damaged and repaired.
  • Scars result in changes that alter the physical architecture of normal skin or other tissue.
  • Scars can occur after physical trauma or as part of a disease process.
  • Poorly controlled wound healing can result in thick, unsightly scars that cause symptoms.
  • There is a genetic predisposition in some people to produce thicker, itchy, enlarging scars called keloids.
  • Scarring in areas of increased skin tension or movement tend to be unsightly.
  • When wounds are produced surgically, physicians utilize techniques to minimize scarring.

What is a scar?

Scarring is the process by which wounds are repaired. Damage to the deeper layer of the skin, the dermis, is required to produce a scar. Damage to only the epidermis, the most superficial layer of skin, will not always produce a scar. Scars produce a structural change in the deeper layers of the skin which is perceived as an alteration in the architecture of the normal surface features. It is not just a change in skin color. Fetal tissues and mucosal tissues have the ability to heal without producing a scar. Understanding how and why this is possible could lead to better surgical scar outcomes.

What are the different types of scars?

There is only one type of scar. The appearance of a scar depends on the nature of the wound that produced the damage, the anatomical location of the wound, and a variety of genetic factors that are different for each individual.

A defective healing process can result in a keloid, an unsightly, itchy, thick, red, knobby bump that often continues to enlarge over time. Keloids often are larger than the margins of the original wound.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/1/2016

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/scars/article.htm

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