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Serax

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Serax

Serax Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking oxazepam (Serax)?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to oxazepam or to other benzodiazepines, such as alprazolam (Xanax), chlordiazepoxide (Librium), clorazepate (Tranxene), diazepam (Valium), or lorazepam (Ativan).

Before taking oxazepam, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • glaucoma;
  • asthma, emphysema, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD), or other breathing problems;
  • kidney or liver disease;
  • a history of depression or suicidal thoughts or behavior; or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take this medication.

Oxazepam can cause birth defects in an unborn baby. Do not use oxazepam without your doctor's consent if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication.

Oxazepam may pass into breast milk and could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

The sedative effects of oxazepam may last longer in older adults. Accidental falls are common in elderly patients who take benzodiazepines. Use caution to avoid falling or accidental injury while you are taking oxazepam.

How should I take oxazepam (Serax)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Oxazepam should be used for only a short time. Do not take this medication for longer than 4 months without your doctor's advice.

Oxazepam may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Oxazepam should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Contact your doctor if this medicine seems to stop working as well in treating your symptoms.

Do not stop using oxazepam suddenly without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely.

Your symptoms may return when you stop using oxazepam after using it over a long period of time. You may also have seizures or withdrawal symptoms when you stop using oxazepam. Withdrawal symptoms may include tremor, sweating, trouble sleeping, muscle cramps, stomach pain, vomiting, diarrhea, confusion, unusual thoughts or behavior, and seizure (convulsions).

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your doctor will need to check your progress on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled visits to your doctor.

Store oxazepam at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Keep track of how many pills have been used from each new bottle of this medicine. Benzodiazepines are drugs of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.

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Serax - User Reviews

Serax User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Serax sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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