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Sotradecol

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Sotradecol

Sotradecol

Sotradecol Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving sodium tetradecyl sulfate (Sotradecol)?

You should not receive sodium tetradecyl sulfate if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • a blood clot disorder such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or thrombophlebitis (swelling of a vein caused by a blood clot);
  • Buerger's disease (a blood clotting disorder affecting the arms and legs);
  • allergies;
  • cancer;
  • a severe infection of your blood (sepsis);
  • any untreated or uncontrolled disease such as diabetes, overactive thyroid, tuberculosis, asthma, blood cell disorder, or skin disease; or
  • if you are bed-ridden due to severe illness.

Sodium tetradecyl sulfate should not be used to treat varicose veins that are caused by a tumor in your stomach or pelvis area, unless the tumor has been surgically removed.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether sodium tetradecyl sulfate will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication..

It is not known whether sodium tetradecyl sulfate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How is sodium tetradecyl sulfate given (Sotradecol)?

Sodium tetradecyl sulfate is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

You will be watched closely for several hours after your injection, to make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects.

Tell your caregivers if you feel any burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when the medicine is injected.

You may need to wear compression stockings for several days or weeks after your treatment. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions about caring for yourself after receiving this medication.

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