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Streptomycin

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Streptomycin

Streptomycin

Streptomycin Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Streptomycin is used with other medications to treat active tuberculosis (TB) infection if you cannot take other drugs for TB or if you have a type of TB that cannot be treated with other drugs (drug-resistant TB). It is an aminoglycoside antibiotic. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, or loss of appetite. Pain/irritation/redness may occur at the injection site.

Dosing of streptomycin is based on the patient's body weight. Treatment regimens vary. Streptomycin may interact with live bacterial vaccines, amphotericin B, diuretics, or high doses of aspirin/NSAIDs. If your doctor has directed you to take low doses of aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke, you should continue to take the aspirin and consult your doctor. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Streptomycin is not recommended for use during pregnancy. Some antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of hormonal birth control; consult your doctor. This medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our streptomycin Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Streptomycin Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warning section.

Nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, or loss of appetite may occur. Pain/irritation/redness may occur at the injection site. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: muscle weakness, persistent diarrhea even after stopping this medication, easy bleeding/bruising, fast heartbeat, new signs of infections (e.g., high fever, persistent cough), change in the amount of urine, unusual tiredness.

Use of this medication for prolonged or repeated periods may result in oral thrush or a new vaginal yeast infection. Contact your doctor if you notice white patches in your mouth, a change in vaginal discharge, or other new symptoms.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Streptomycin (Streptomycin)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Streptomycin FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

The following reactions are common: vestibular ototoxicity (nausea, vomiting, and vertigo); paresthesia of face; rash; fever; urticaria; angioneurotic edema; and eosinophilia.

The following reactions are less frequent: cochlear ototoxicity (deafness); exfoliative dermatitis; anaphylaxis; azotemia; leucopenia; thrombocytopenia; pancytopenia; hemolytic anemia; muscular weakness; and amblyopia.

Vestibular dysfunction resulting from the parenteral administration of streptomycin is cumulatively related to the total daily dose. When 1.8 to 2 g/day are given, symptoms are likely to develop in the large percentage of patients - especially in the elderly or patients with impaired renal function - within four weeks. Therefore, it is recommended that caloric and audiometric tests be done prior to, during, and following intensive therapy with streptomycin in order to facilitate detection of any vestibular dysfunction and/or impairment of hearing which may occur.

Vestibular symptoms generally appear early and usually are reversible with early detection and cessation of streptomycin administration. Two to three months after stopping the drug, gross vestibular symptoms usually disappear, except from the relative inability to walk in total darkness or on very rough terrain.

Although streptomycin is the least nephrotoxic of the aminoglycosides, nephrotoxicity does occur rarely.

Clinical judgment as to termination of therapy must be exercised when side effects occur.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Streptomycin (Streptomycin) »

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Streptomycin - User Reviews

Streptomycin User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Streptomycin sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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