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Stress

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Stress facts

  • Stress is a normal part of life that can either help us learn and grow or can cause us significant problems.
  • Stress releases powerful neurochemicals and hormones that prepare us for action (to fight or flee).
  • If we don't take action, the stress response can create or worsen health problems.
  • Prolonged, uninterrupted, unexpected, and unmanageable stresses are the most damaging types of stress.
  • Stress can be managed by seeking support from loved ones, regular exercise, meditation or other relaxation techniques, structured timeouts, and learning new coping strategies to create predictability in our lives.
  • Many behaviors that increase in times of stress and maladaptive ways of coping with stress -- drugs, pain medicines, alcohol, smoking, and eating -- actually worsen the stress and can make us more reactive (sensitive) to further stress.
  • While there are promising treatments for stress, the management of stress is mostly dependent on the ability and willingness of a person to make the changes necessary for a healthy lifestyle.

What is stress?

Stress is simply a fact of nature -- forces from the inside or outside world affecting the individual. The individual responds to stress in ways that affect the individual as well as their environment. Because of the overabundance of stress in our modern lives, we usually think of stress as a negative experience, but from a biological point of view, stress can be a neutral, negative, or positive experience.

In general, stress is related to both external and internal factors. External factors include the physical environment, including your job, your relationships with others, your home, and all the situations, challenges, difficulties, and expectations you're confronted with on a daily basis. Internal factors determine your body's ability to respond to, and deal with, the external stress-inducing factors. Internal factors which influence your ability to handle stress include your nutritional status, overall health and fitness levels, emotional well-being, and the amount of sleep and rest you get.

Stress has driven evolutionary change (the development and natural selection of species over time). Thus, the species that adapted best to the causes of stress (stressors) have survived and evolved into the plant and animal kingdoms we now observe.

Picture of areas of the body that are affected by stress
Picture of some of the areas of the body that are affected by stress

Man is the most adaptive creature on the planet because of the evolution of the human brain, especially the part called the neo-cortex. This adaptability is largely due to the changes and stressors that we have faced and mastered. Therefore, we, unlike other animals, can live in any climate or ecosystem, at various altitudes, and avoid the danger of predators. Moreover, most recently, we have learned to live in the air, under the sea, and even in space, where no living creatures that we know of have ever survived. So then, what is so bad about stress?

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/4/2013

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Stress - Physical Symptoms Question: Symptoms of stress can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your physical symptoms?
Stress - Management Question: What stress management techniques have worked for you?
Stress - Effect on Health Question: Do you have a physical or psychological condition that is made worse by stress? Please share your story.
Stress - Teen Symptoms Question: If you're under 20, what makes you stressed out? How do you deal with your symptoms?
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/stress/article.htm

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