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Sucraid

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Sucraid

Sucraid Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Sucraid

Generic Name: sacrosidase (Pronunciation: sak ROE si dase)

What is sacrosidase (Sucraid)?

Sacrosidase is a yeast-based enzyme that replaces an enzyme called sucrase which is normally produced in the body. Sucrase helps the body breakdown and process certain sugars during digestion.

In people who lack the sucrase enzyme, sugar can pass into the intestines where it can interact with bacteria. This can cause bloating, gas, stomach pain, nausea, and vomiting.

Sacrosidase is used to treat sucrase deficiency that occurs in people with congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID).

CSID is a genetic enzyme deficiency and sacrosidase will not cure this condition.

Sacrosidase may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of sacrosidase (Sucraid)?

Stop using this medication and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; wheezing, difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • stomach pain;
  • nausea, vomiting;
  • diarrhea, constipation;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • headache;
  • nervous feeling; or
  • increased thirst and dry, hot skin.

Some of these may be symptoms of your condition and not actual side effects of sacrosidase.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Sucraid (sacrosidase oral solution) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about sacrosidase (Sucraid)?

Sacrosidase is used to treat sucrase deficiency that occurs in people with congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID). CSID is a genetic enzyme deficiency and sacrosidase will not cure this condition.

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to yeast, yeast products, glycerin (glycerol), or papain (Accuzyme, Ethezyme, Gladase, Kovia, and others).

Before using sacrosidase, tell your doctor if you have diabetes. Sacrosidase changes the way your body absorbs sugar and your glucose levels may change. Your doctor will tell you if any of your medication doses need to be changed.

This medication sometimes causes an allergic reaction. Before you start the medication, your doctor may recommend a sacrosidase skin test to make sure you are not allergic to the medication.

Sacrosidase is usually taken with each meal or snack. It is best to take one half of the dose when you start eating and take the other half during your meal or snack.

Measure your dose using the scoop provided with this medication.

Sacrosidase liquid should be mixed with 2 to 4 ounces of water, milk, or baby formula that is no hotter than room temperature. Do not mix with warm or hot liquids or the medication will not be as effective.

Do not mix sacrosidase with fruit juice or drink fruit juice when taking the medication.

You may need to avoid eating a lot of starch (found mainly in rice, potatoes, corn, pasta, and bread). Follow your doctor's instructions about any special diet while you are taking sacrosidase.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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