font size


Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
(SLE or Lupus)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:
Medical Editor:

Systemic lupus erythematosus facts

  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease.
  • SLE is characterized by the production of unusual antibodies in the blood.
  • SLE is eight times more common in women than men.
  • The cause(s) of SLE is (are) unknown, however, heredity, viruses, ultraviolet light, and drugs all may play some role.
  • Up to 10% of people with lupus isolated to the skin will develop the systemic form of lupus (SLE).
  • Eleven criteria help doctors to diagnose SLE.
  • Treatment of SLE is directed toward decreasing inflammation and/or the level of autoimmune activity.
  • People with SLE can prevent "flares" of disease by avoiding sun exposure, not abruptly discontinuing medications, and monitoring their condition with their doctor.

What is systemic lupus erythematosus? What are the types of lupus?

Lupus is an autoimmune disease characterized by acute and chronic inflammation of various tissues of the body. Autoimmune diseases are illnesses that occur when the body's tissues are attacked by its own immune system. The immune system is a complex system within the body that is designed to fight infectious agents, such as bacteria and other foreign microbes. One of the ways that the immune system fights infections is by producing antibodies that bind to the microbes. People with lupus produce abnormal antibodies in their blood that target tissues within their own body rather than foreign infectious agents. These antibodies are referred to as autoantibodies.

Because the antibodies and accompanying cells of inflammation can affect tissues anywhere in the body, lupus has the potential to affect a variety of areas. Sometimes lupus can cause disease of the skin, heart, lungs, kidneys, joints, and/or nervous system. When only the skin is involved by rash, the condition is called lupus dermatitis or cutaneous lupus erythematosus. A form of lupus dermatitis that can be isolated to the skin, without internal disease, is called discoid lupus. When internal organs are involved, the condition is referred to as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Both discoid lupus and systemic lupus are more common in women than men (about eight times more common). The disease can affect all ages but most commonly begins from 20-45 years of age. Statistics demonstrate that lupus is somewhat more frequent in African Americans and people of Chinese and Japanese descent.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/13/2014

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Lupus - Symptoms Question: The symptoms of lupus can vary greatly from patient to patient. What were your symptoms at the onset of your disease?
Lupus - Experience Question: Please describe your experience with lupus.
Lupus - Treatment Question: What kinds of treatment have you received for your systemic lupus?
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/systemic_lupus/article.htm

WebMD Daily

Get breaking medical news.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations