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Tabloid

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Tabloid

Tabloid Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Tabloid (thioguanine 40-mg) is a cancer (antineoplastic) medication used to treat certain types of leukemia. It is sometimes given with other cancer medications. This medication may be available in generic form. Common side effects include upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

The dosage of Tabloid which will be tolerated and effective varies according to the stage and type of cancer being treated. Tabloid may interact with acetaminophen (Tylenol), auranofin, azathioprine, cyclosporine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, olsalazine, mesalamine, sulfasalazine, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy, blood thinners, tuberculosis medications, cholesterol medications, NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), ACE inhibitors, antibiotics, antifungals, seizure medications, or HIV/AIDS medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tabloid is not recommended for use during pregnancy. It may harm a fetus. Consult your doctor to discuss birth control. If you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant, tell your doctor. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Because of the possible risk to the infant, breastfeeding while using Tabloid is not recommended.

Our Tabloid (thioguanine 40-mg) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Tabloid in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using thioguanine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • pale skin, feeling light-headed or short of breath, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating;
  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, sores or white patches in your mouth and throat;
  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;
  • severe vomiting, ongoing diarrhea;
  • severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, fast heart rate;
  • bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; or
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • vomiting, mild diarrhea;
  • hair loss;
  • mild itching or skin rash; or
  • darkened skin color.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Tabloid (Thioguanine) »

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Tabloid Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: Upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, contact your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: easy bruising/bleeding, dizziness/fainting, joint pain/swelling, persistent nausea/vomiting, stomach/abdominal pain, tongue/mouth sores or pain, unusual tiredness, dark urine, yellowing eyes/skin.

This medication can lower the body's ability to fight an infection. Tell your doctor promptly if you develop any signs of an infection such as fever, chills, or persistent sore throat.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Tabloid (Thioguanine)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Tabloid FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

The most frequent adverse reaction to thioguanine is myelosuppression. The induction of complete remission of acute myelogenous leukemia usually requires combination chemotherapy in dosages which produce marrow hypoplasia. Since consolidation and maintenance of remission are also effected by multiple-drug regimens whose component agents cause myelosuppression, pancytopenia is observed in nearly all patients. Dosages and schedules must be adjusted to prevent life-threatening cytopenias whenever these adverse reactions are observed.

Hyperuricemia frequently occurs in patients receiving thioguanine as a consequence of rapid cell lysis accompanying the antineoplastic effect. Adverse effects can be minimized by increased hydration, urine alkalinization, and the prophylactic administration of a xanthine oxidase inhibitor such as ZYLOPRIM® (allopurinol). Unlike PURINETHOL (mercaptopurine) and IMURAN® (azathioprine), thioguanine may be continued in the usual dosage when allopurinol is used conjointly to inhibit uric acid formation.

Less frequent adverse reactions include nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and stomatitis. Intestinal necrosis and perforation have been reported in patients who received multiple-drug chemotherapy including thioguanine.

Hepatic Effects: Liver toxicity associated with vascular endothelial damage has been reported when thioguanine is used in maintenance or similar long term continuous therapy which is not recommended (see WARNINGS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION). This usually presents as the clinical syndrome of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (hyperbilirubinemia, tender hepatomegaly, weight gain due to fluid retention, and ascites) or signs and symptoms of portal hypertension (splenomegaly, thrombocytopenia, and esophageal varices). Elevation of liver transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma glutamyl transferase and jaundice may also occur. Histopathological features associated with this toxicity include hepatoportal sclerosis, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, peliosis hepatitis, and periportal fibrosis.

Liver toxicity during short term cyclical therapy presents as veno-occlusive disease. Reversal of signs and symptoms of this liver toxicity has been reported upon withdrawal of short term or long term continuous therapy.

Centrilobular hepatic necrosis has been reported in a few cases; however, the reports are confounded by the use of high doses of thioguanine, other chemotherapeutic agents, and oral contraceptives and chronic alcohol abuse.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Tabloid (Thioguanine) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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