Recommended Topic Related To:

Tekamlo

"Dec. 14, 2012 -- Drinking a glass of beet juice may have an immediate impact on lowering blood pressure, according to a new study.

The study shows that within hours of drinking it, beet juice lowered systolic blood pressure (the top n"...

Tekamlo

Tekamlo Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking this drug (Tekamlo)?

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to aliskiren or amlodipine, or if you are also using cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune) or itraconazole (Sporanox).

If you have diabetes or kidney disease, you may not be able to take aliskiren and amlodipine if you are also taking any of the following heart or blood pressure medications:

  • azilsartan (Edarbi, Edarbyclor), candesartan (Atacand), eprosartan (Teveten), irbesartan (Avapro, Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar), valsartan (Diovan), telmisartan (Micardis); or
  • benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik, Tarka).

To make sure you can safely take aliskiren and amlodipine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis);
  • liver disease;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • coronary artery disease (hardened arteries);
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);
  • if you are on a low-salt diet; or
  • if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a blood pressure medication, such as benazepril (Lotensin), candesartan (Atacand), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), losartan (Cozaar, Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, Azor), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), telmisartan (Micardis, Twynsta), valsartan (Diovan, Exforge), and others.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use aliskiren and amlodipine if you are pregnant. Stop using this medication and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant. Aliskiren and amlodipine can cause injury or death to the unborn baby if you take the medicine during your second or third trimester. Use effective birth control while taking aliskiren and amlodipine.

It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking aliskiren and amlodipine.

How should I take this drug (Tekamlo)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your chest pain may become worse when you first start taking amlodipine or when your dose is increased. Call your doctor if your chest pain is severe or ongoing.

Aliskiren and amlodipine may be taken with or without food, but take it the same way each time.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. Visit your doctor regularly.

Conditions that may cause very low blood pressure include: vomiting, diarrhea, heavy sweating, heart disease, dialysis, a low-salt diet, or taking diuretics (water pills). Tell your doctor if you have a prolonged illness that causes diarrhea or vomiting.

Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Side Effects Centers
A A A

Tekamlo - User Reviews

Tekamlo User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Tekamlo sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Hypertension

Get tips on handling your hypertension.


NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD