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Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed

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Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed

Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed

Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving tetanus toxoid vaccine (Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed)?

Anyone who had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of tetanus vaccine should not get another dose.

Before receiving tetanus toxoid, talk to your doctor if you:

  • have HIV or AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system;
  • are taking a medication that affects the immune system (e.g. steroids, anti-rejection medications);
  • have cancer; or
  • are receiving cancer treatment with x-rays, radiation, or medication.

Ask your healthcare provider for more information. Tetanus toxoid vaccine may not be recommended in some cases.

Individuals with minor illnesses, such as a cold, may be vaccinated. Those who are moderately or severely ill should usually wait until they recover before getting tetanus toxoid vaccine.

Talk to your doctor before receiving tetanus toxoid vaccine if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby.

How are tetanus toxoid vaccine administered (Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed)?

Your doctor, nurse, or other healthcare provider will administer the tetanus toxoid vaccine as an injection.

Tetanus toxoid vaccine can help prevent tetanus. Tetanus toxoid vaccine is made for people 7 years of age and older. After a person completes the primary immunization schedule, a tetanus toxoid vaccine booster dose is needed every 10 years all through life. Talk to your doctor about the primary immunization and booster schedule.

Tetanus toxoid vaccine may be given at the same time as other vaccines.

Your doctor may recommend reducing pain or soreness from the injection by taking an aspirin-free pain reliever such as acetaminophen (Tylenol, Tempra, others) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others) when the shot is given and for the next 24-48 hours. Your healthcare provider can tell you the appropriate dosages of these medications.

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