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Tetanus (cont.)

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How is tetanus prevented?

Active immunization ("tetanus shots") plays an essential role in preventing tetanus. Preventative measures to protect the skin from being penetrated by the tetanus bacteria are also important. For instance, precautions should be taken to avoid stepping on nails by wearing shoes. If a penetrating wound should occur, it should be thoroughly cleansed with soap and water and medical attention should be sought. Finally, passive immunization can be administered in selected cases (with specialized immunoglobulin).

What is the schedule for active immunization (tetanus shots)?

All children should be immunized against tetanus by receiving a series of five DTaP vaccinations which generally are started at 2 months of age and completed at approximately 5 years of age. Booster vaccination is recommended at 11 years of age with Tdap.

Follow-up booster vaccination is recommended every 10 years thereafter. While a 10-year period of protection exists after the basic childhood series is completed, should a potentially contaminated wound occur, an "early" booster may be given in selected cases and the 10 years "clock" reset.

What are the side effects of tetanus immunization?

Side effects of tetanus immunization occur in approximately 25% of vaccine recipients. The most frequent side effects are usually quite mild (and familiar) and include soreness, swelling, and/or redness at the site of the injection. More significant reactions are extraordinarily rare. The incidence of this particular reaction increases with decreasing interval between boosters.

What is passive immunization (by way of specialized immunoglobulin)?

In individuals who exhibit the early symptoms of tetanus or in those whose immunization status is unknown or significantly out of date, the tetanus immunoglobulin (TIG) is given into the muscle surrounding the wound with the remainder of the dose given into the buttocks.

Medically reviewed by Robert Cox, MD; American Board of Internal Medicine with subspecialty in Infectious Disease

REFERENCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics. "Tetanus (Lockjaw)." In: Pickering, L.K., ed. Red Book: 2009 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 28th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 2009.

Braunwald, Eugene, et al. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 17th ed. United States: McGraw-Hill, 2008.


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/3/2014

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Tetanus - Describe Your Experience Question: What were the symptoms of your tetanus?
Tetanus - Treatment Question: What kinds of treatment, including medication, were used for tetanus in you or someone you know?
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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/tetanus/article.htm

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