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Trisenox

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Trisenox

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Trisenox

Trisenox Consumer

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

ARSENIC TRIOXIDE - INJECTION

(AR-se-nik trye-OX-ide)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Trisenox

WARNING: Arsenic trioxide is a strong medication that can cause serious, rarely fatal side effects. To decrease your risk, your doctor will monitor you closely during treatment.

Infrequently, this medication may cause a serious condition called APL differentiation syndrome. Tell your doctor immediately if the following effects occur: unusual/unexplained fever, shortness of breath/difficulty breathing, and/or weight gain. Your doctor may direct you to weigh yourself regularly and report any sudden weight gain. Your doctor may also perform certain exams or tests (e.g., lung exam, X-rays) to determine if this syndrome has developed.

Infrequently, this medication can also cause serious (rarely fatal) heart problems (e.g., AV block, torsades de pointes-type arrhythmias). Tell your doctor if you have any medical history of heart problems (e.g., fast/irregular heartbeat, heart failure), kidney problems, low levels of minerals in your blood (e.g., calcium, potassium, magnesium). Also tell your doctor if you take any medications that increase your risk for these heart problems or low levels of minerals (see also Drug Interactions section). To decrease your risk, your doctor may order a heart rhythm test (EKG) or blood tests before and during treatment.

Seek immediate medical attention if you develop severe dizziness, fainting, or fast/irregular heartbeat.

USES: Arsenic trioxide is used to treat a type of leukemia (acute promyelocytic leukemia-APL) when other types of treatment (e.g., chemotherapy) have not worked well or no longer work.

HOW TO USE: This medication is given by injection into a vein by a health care professional over 1 to 2 hours, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. The injection may be injected more slowly (e.g., over 4 hours) if you have a reaction to the medication such as dizziness, flushing, or fast heartbeat.

The dosage and length of treatment is based on your weight, medical condition, and response to treatment. Your doctor will order tests (e.g., EKG, blood minerals) to find the right dose for you. Your next dose may need to be rescheduled if your heartbeat or blood tests are abnormal.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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