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Urinary Incontinence in Children (cont.)

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What is the treatment for urinary incontinence in children?

The treatment of urinary incontinence depends upon the underlying cause of the problem. The primary treatment for nocturnal enuresis most commonly involves behavioral modification. This involves positive reinforcement, encouraging frequent daytime voiding, and periodically waking the child at night, restricting fluid intake prior to bed, and alarm therapy with devices that wake the child when the underwear or bedclothes have become wet. In all cases, most children are already embarrassed by bedwetting and it is important try to reduce the social and psychological impact of the condition. Moisture alarm therapy has a 70% success rate and works best for motivated older children and parents. The basic process involves placing a probe in the undergarments or bed which alarms when it senses wetness. Most children will sleep through the alarm; however, most stop voiding when the alarm goes off. The child's parent must get up and help the child to the bathroom to encourage voiding, change the wet sheets and pajamas, and reset the alarm. Moisture alarms generally work within two weeks to three months and should be discontinued if the child's symptoms persist after three months.

In addition to behavioral modification, there are some children who will ultimate require medication. Most commonly used medications include desmopressin acetate (DDAVP), oxybutynin chloride (Ditropan), hyoscyamine sulphate (Levsin), and imipramine (Tofranil). All of these medications have significant potential for side effects, should be reserved for a very select population, and should be used to treat the symptoms not as a cure, while awaiting natural resolution. Medications can be used intermittently for children who attend overnight camp or for sleepovers since these are 70% effective in preventing the symptoms, and bedwetting in these environments can be humiliating and stress-producing for children.


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Urinary Incontinence in Children - Nighttime Question: Please discuss your child's symptoms of and experience with nighttime incontinence.
Urinary Incontinence in Children - Daytime Question: Does your child have daytime incontinence? Please share your family's experience.
Urinary Incontinence in Children - Treatment Question: What kinds of treatment, therapy, or medication did your child have for his/her urinary incontinence?
Urinary Incontinence in Children - Coping and Prognosis Question: Did you or your child have urinary incontinence? Please share tips for coping or dealing with the problem.
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/urinary_incontinence_in_children/article.htm

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