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Uvadex

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Uvadex

Disclaimer

Uvadex Consumer

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

METHOXSALEN - INJECTION

(meh-THOX-sal-en)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Uvadex

USES: This medication is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), a type of cancer that affects the skin and blood and sometimes the lymph nodes and other organs. CTCL is caused by the uncontrolled growth of abnormal white blood cells in the skin. This drug is used in a procedure called photopheresis. Some of your blood is removed from your body through a vein and goes into a special machine that separates the white blood cells. The machine adds methoxsalen to these white blood cells, then shines ultraviolet (UV) light on them. Then the machine returns the treated cells (and the rest of your blood) to your body through the same vein. Your immune system is thought to react to the treated cells and other similar untreated T-cells that are not working properly. This effect helps to restore your immune balance and lessens the skin problems (e.g., rash, plaques, tumors) of CTCL. Methoxsalen is known as a psoralen photosensitizer. It works by making the treated white blood cells more sensitive to UV light.

HOW TO USE: See Uses section.

This medication is injected into your collected white blood cells during photopheresis by a health care professional. This medication is usually used once a day for 2 days in a row or as directed by your doctor. Photopheresis is usually repeated every 4 weeks depending on your response to treatment.

Dosage is based on your medical condition, the amount of white blood cells collected, and response to treatment.

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