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Vectibix

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Vectibix

Vectibix

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of the label:

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. The adverse reaction information from clinical studies does, however, provide a basis for identifying the adverse events that appear to be related to drug use and for approximating rates.

Safety data are presented from two clinical trials in which patients received Vectibix: Study 1, an open-label, multinational, randomized, controlled, monotherapy clinical trial (N = 463) evaluating Vectibix with best supportive care (BSC) versus BSC alone in patients with EGFR-expressing mCRC and Study 3, a randomized, controlled trial (N = 1183) in patients with mCRC that evaluated Vectibix in combination with FOLFOX chemotherapy versus FOLFOX chemotherapy alone. Safety data for Study 3 are limited to 656 patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC.

Vectibix Monotherapy

In Study 1, the most common adverse reactions ( ≥ 20%) with Vectibix were skin rash with variable presentations, paronychia, fatigue, nausea, and diarrhea.

The most common ( > 5%) serious adverse reactions in the Vectibix arm were general physical health deterioration and intestinal obstruction. The most frequently reported adverse reactions for Vectibix leading to withdrawal were general physical health deterioration (n = 2) and intestinal obstruction (n = 2).

For Study 1, the data described in Table 1 and in other sections below, except where noted, reflect exposure to Vectibix administered to patients with mCRC as a single agent at the recommended dose and schedule (6 mg/kg every 2 weeks).

Table 1: Adverse Reactions ( ≥ 5% Difference) Observed in Patients Treated with Vectibix Monotherapy and Best Supportive Care Compared to Best Supportive Care Alone (Study 1)

SYSTEM ORGAN CLASS Preferred Term Study 1
Vectibix Plus Best Supportive Care
(N = 229)
Best Supportive Care
(N = 234)
Any Grade
n (%)
Grade 3-4
n (%)
Any Grade
n (%)
Grade 3-4
n (%)
EYE DISORDERS
  Growth of eyelashes 13 (6)      
GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS
  Nausea 52 (23) 2 ( < 1) 37 (16) 1 ( < 1)
  Diarrhea 49 (21) 4 (2) 26 (11)  
  Vomiting 43 (19) 6 (3) 28 (12) 2 ( < 1)
  Stomatitis 15 (7)   2 ( < 1)  
GENERAL DISORDERS AND ADMINISTRATION SITE CONDITIONS
  Fatigue 60 (26) 10 (4) 34 (15) 7 (3)
  Mucosal inflammation 15 (7) 1 ( < 1) 2 ( < 1)  
INFECTIONS AND INFESTATIONS
  Paronychia 57 (25) 4 (2)    
RESPIRATORY, THORACIC, AND MEDIASTINAL DISORDERS
  Dyspnea 41 (18) 12 (5) 30 (13) 8 (3)
  Cough 34 (15) 1 ( < 1) 17 (7)  
SKIN AND SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE DISORDERS
  Erythema 150 (66) 13 (6) 2 ( < 1)  
  Pruritus 132 (58) 6 (3) 4 (2)  
  Acneiform dermatitis 131 (57) 17 (7) 2 ( < 1)  
  Rash 51 (22) 3 (1) 2 ( < 1)  
  Skin fissures 45 (20) 3 (1) 1 ( < 1)  
  Exfoliative rash 41 (18) 4 (2)    
  Acne 31(14) 3 (1)    
  Dry skin 23 (10)      
  Nail disorder 22 (10)      
  Skin exfoliation 21 (9) 2 ( < 1)    
  Skin ulcer 13 (6) 1 ( < 1)    

Adverse reactions in Study 1 that did not meet the threshold criteria for inclusion in Table 1 were conjunctivitis (4.8% vs < 1%), dry mouth (4.8% vs 0%), pyrexia (16.6% vs 13.2%), chills (3.1% vs < 1%), pustular rash (4.4% vs 0%), papular rash (1.7% vs 0%), dehydration (2.6% vs 1.7%), epistaxis (3.9% vs 0%), and pulmonary embolism (1.3% vs 0%).

In Study 1, dermatologic toxicities occurred in 90% of patients receiving Vectibix. Skin toxicity was severe (NCICTC grade 3 and higher) in 15% of patients. Ocular toxicities occurred in 16% of patients and included, but were not limited to, conjunctivitis (5%). One patient experienced an NCI-CTC grade 3 event of mucosal inflammation. The incidence of paronychia was 25% and was severe in 2% of patients [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

In Study 1 (N = 229), median time to the development of dermatologic, nail, or ocular toxicity was 12 days after the first dose of Vectibix; the median time to most severe skin/ocular toxicity was 15 days after the first dose of Vectibix; and the median time to resolution after the last dose of Vectibix was 98 days. Severe toxicity necessitated dose interruption in 11% of Vectibix-treated patients [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Subsequent to the development of severe dermatologic toxicities, infectious complications, including sepsis, septic death, necrotizing fasciitis, and abscesses requiring incisions and drainage were reported.

Vectibix in Combination with FOLFOX Chemotherapy

The most commonly reported adverse reactions ( ≥ 20%) in patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC receiving Vectibix (6 mg/kg every 2 weeks) and FOLFOX therapy (N = 322) in Study 3 were diarrhea, stomatitis, mucosal inflammation, asthenia, paronychia, anorexia, hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, rash, acneiform dermatitis, pruritus, and dry skin (Table 2). Serious adverse reactions ( ≥ 2% difference between treatment arms) in Vectibix-treated patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC were diarrhea and dehydration. The commonly reported adverse reactions ( ≥ 1%) leading to discontinuation in patients with wild-type KRAS mCRC receiving Vectibix were rash, paresthesia, fatigue, diarrhea, acneiform dermatitis, and hypersensitivity. One grade 5 adverse reaction, hypokalemia, occurred in a patient who received Vectibix.

Table 2: Adverse Reactions ( ≥ 5% Difference) Observed in Patients with Wild-type (WT) KRAS Tumors Treated with Vectibix and FOLFOX Chemotherapy Compared to FOLFOX Chemotherapy Alone (Study 3)

SYSTEM ORGAN CLASS
Preferred Term
Vectibix Plus FOLFOX
(n = 322)
FOLFOX Alone
(n = 327)
Any Grade
n (%)
Grade 3-4
n (%)
Any Grade
n (%)
Grade 3-4
n (%)
EYE DISORDERS
  Conjunctivitis 58 (18) 5 (2) 10 (3)  
GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS
  Diarrhea 201 (62) 59 (18) 169 (52) 29 (9)
  Stomatitis 87 (27) 15 (5) 42 (13) 1 ( < 1)
GENERAL DISORDERS AND ADMINISTRATION SITE CONDITIONS
  Mucosal inflammation 82 (25) 14 (4) 53(16) 1 ( < 1)
  Asthenia 79 (25) 16 (5) 62 (19) 11 (3)
INFECTIONS AND INFESTATIONS
  Paronychia 68 (21) 11 (3)    
INVESTIGATIONS
  Weight decreased 58 (18) 3 ( < 1) 22 (7)  
METABOLISM AND NUTRITION DISORDERS
  Anorexia 116 (36) 14 (4) 85 (26) 6 (2)
  Hypomagnesemia 96 (30) 21 (7) 26 (8) 1 ( < 1)
  Hypokalemia 68 (21) 32 (10) 42 (13) 15 (5)
  Dehydration 26 (8) 8 (2) 10 (3) 5 (2)
RESPIRATORY, THORACIC, AND MEDIASTINAL DISORDERS
  Epistaxis 46 (14)   30 (9)  
SKIN AND SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE DISORDERS
  Rash 179 (56) 55 (17) 24 (7) 1 ( < 1)
  Acneiform dermatitis 104 (32) 33 (10)    
  Pruritus 75 (23) 3 ( < 1) 14 (4)  
  Dry skin 68 (21) 5 (2) 13 (4)  
  Erythema 50 (16) 7 (2) 14 (4)  
  Skin fissures 50 (16) 1 ( < 1) 1 ( < 1)  
  Alopecia 47 (15) 30 (9)  
  Acne 44 (14) 10 (3) 1 ( < 1)  
  Nail disorder 32 (10) 4 (1) 4 (1)  
  Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome 30 (9) 4 (1) 9 (3) 2 ( < 1)

Adverse reactions that did not meet the threshold criteria for inclusion in Table 2 were abdominal pain (28% vs 23%), localized infection (3.7% vs < 1%), cellulitis (2.5% vs 0%), hypocalcemia (5.6% vs 2.1%), and deep vein thrombosis (5.3% vs 3.1%).

Infusion Reactions

Infusional toxicity manifesting as fever, chills, dyspnea, bronchospasm or hypotension was assessed within 24 hours of an infusion during the clinical study. Vital signs and temperature were measured within 30 minutes prior to initiation and upon completion of the Vectibix infusion. The use of premedication was not standardized in the clinical trials. Thus, the utility of premedication in preventing the first or subsequent episodes of infusional toxicity is unknown. Across clinical trials of Vectibix monotherapy, 3% (24/725) experienced infusion reactions of which < 1% (3/725) were severe (NCI-CTC grade 3-4). In one patient, Vectibix was permanently discontinued for a serious infusion reaction [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Immunogenicity

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. The immunogenicity of Vectibix has been evaluated using two different screening immunoassays for the detection of binding anti-panitumumab antibodies: an acid dissociation bridging enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detecting high-affinity antibodies and a Biacore® biosensor immunoassay detecting both high-and low-affinity antibodies. For patients whose sera tested positive in screening immunoassays, an in vitro biological assay was performed to detect neutralizing antibodies.

Monotherapy

The incidence of binding anti-panitumumab antibodies (excluding preexisting and transient positive patients) was 0.4% (5/1123) as detected by the acid dissociation ELISA and 3.2% (36/1123) as detected by the Biacore® assay. The incidence of neutralizing anti-panitumumab antibodies (excluding preexisting and transient positive patients) was 0.8% (9/1123). There was no evidence of altered pharmacokinetic or safety profiles in patients who developed antibodies to Vectibix.

In combination with chemotherapy: The incidence of binding anti-panitumumab antibodies (excluding preexisting positive patients) was 0.9% (12/1297) as detected by the acid dissociation ELISA and 0.7% (9/1296) as detected by the Biacore® assay. The incidence of neutralizing anti-panitumumab antibodies (excluding preexisting positive patients) was 0.2% (2/1297). No evidence of an altered safety profile was found in patients who developed antibodies to Vectibix.

The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Additionally, the observed incidence of antibody (including neutralizing antibody) positivity in an assay may be influenced by several factors, including assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medications, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to panitumumab with the incidence of antibodies to other products may be misleading.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of Vectibix. Because these reactions are reported in a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Read the Vectibix (panitumumab injection for intravenous use) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

DRUG INTERACTIONS

No formal drug-drug interaction studies have been conducted between Vectibix and oxaliplatin or fluoropyrimidine.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/9/2014
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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