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Vepesid

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VePesid

VePesid

Vepesid Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

VePesid (etoposide) is a cancer (antineoplastic) medication used alone or in combination with other chemotherapies to treat cancer of the testicles or lung, or other types of cancer. It is also commonly known as VP-16. Generic forms of this medication may be available. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, stomach pain, diarrhea, fatigue, or temporary hair loss.

The recommended dosage of VePesid is one capsule usually taken once a day for 4 or 5 days in a row. This cycle may be repeated once every 3 to 4 weeks. Do not break or open an etoposide capsule. The medicine from a broken capsule can be dangerous if it gets in your eyes, mouth, or nose, or on your skin. VePesid may interact with cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf). Tell your doctor all medications you use. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. Males and females using this drug should use birth control (e.g., birth control pills, condoms) during treatment; consult your doctor. It is unknown if this medication passes into breast milk. It may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Breastfeeding while using VePesid is not recommended.

Our VePesid (etoposide) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Vepesid in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms;
  • white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness;
  • fast heart rate;
  • severe nausea and vomiting;
  • feeling light-headed, fainting; or
  • low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as:

  • mild nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;
  • mild itching or skin rash; or
  • temporary hair loss.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Vepesid (Etoposide) »

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Vepesid Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: (see also Warning section)

Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, strange aftertaste, diarrhea, mouth sores, muscle aches, drowsiness, fatigue, or skin color changes may occur. Nausea and vomiting can be quite severe. In some cases, drug therapy may be necessary to prevent or relieve nausea and vomiting. Changes in diet such as eating several small meals or limiting activity may help decrease some of these effects. If these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Temporary hair loss may occur. Hair growth should return after treatment has ended.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Etoposide, along with certain other anti-cancer drugs, has been known to cause acute leukemia. This is very rare. Consult your doctor for more details.

Etoposide can lower the body's ability to fight an infection. Notify your doctor promptly if you develop any signs of an infection, such as fever, chills or persistent sore throat.

Tell your doctor immediately if this unlikely side effect occurs: tingling of hands or feet.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: yellowing of the eyes or skin, tarry or bloody stool, vision changes, abdominal pain, redness or swelling of your veins.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, sweating, chest tightness, fast or irregular heartbeat, skin turning blue, cough, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Vepesid (Etoposide)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Vepesid FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

The following data on adverse reactions are based on both oral and intravenous administration of VePesid (etoposide) as a single agent, using several different dose schedules for treatment of a wide variety of malignancies.

Hematologic Toxicity

Myelosuppression is dose related and dose limiting, with granulocyte nadirs occurring 7 to 14 days after drug administration and platelet nadirs occurring 9 to 16 days after drug administration. Bone marrow recovery is usually complete by day 20, and no cumulative toxicity has been reported. Fever and infection have also been reported in patients with neutropenia. Death associated with myelosuppression has been reported.

The occurrence of acute leukemia with or without a preleukemic phase has been reported rarely in patients treated with VePesid (etoposide) in association with other antineoplastic agents. (See WARNINGS.)

Gastrointestinal Toxicity

Nausea and vomiting are the major gastrointestinal toxicities. The severity of such nausea and vomiting is generally mild to moderate with treatment discontinuation required in 1% of patients. Nausea and vomiting can usually be controlled with standard antiemetic therapy. Mild to severe mucositis/esophagitis may occur. Gastrointestinal toxicities are slightly more frequent after oral administration than after intravenous infusion.

Allergic Reactions

Anaphylactic-like reactions characterized by chills, fever, tachycardia, bronchospasm, dyspnea, and/or hypotension have been reported to occur in 0.7% to 2% of patients receiving intravenous VePesid (etoposide) and in less than 1% of the patients treated with the oral capsules. These reactions have usually responded promptly to the cessation of the infusion and administration of pressor agents, corticosteroids, antihistamines, or volume expanders as appropriate; however, the reactions can be fatal. Hypertension and/or flushing have also been reported. Blood pressure usually normalizes within a few hours after cessation of the infusion. Anaphylactic-like reactions have occurred during the initial infusion of VePesid (etoposide) .

Facial/tongue swelling, coughing, diaphoresis, cyanosis, tightness in throat, laryngospasm, back pain, and/or loss of consciousness have sometimes occurred in association with the above reactions. In addition, an apparent hypersensitivity-associated apnea has been reported rarely.

Rash, urticaria, and/or pruritus have infrequently been reported at recommended doses. At investigational doses, a generalized pruritic erythematous maculopapular rash, consistent with perivasculitis, has been reported.

Alopecia

Reversible alopecia, sometimes progressing to total baldness, was observed in up to 66% of patients.

Other Toxicities

The following adverse reactions have been infrequently reported: abdominal pain, aftertaste, constipation, dysphagia, asthenia, fatigue, malaise, somnolence, transient cortical blindness, optic neuritis, interstitial pneumonitis/pulmonary fibrosis, fever, seizure (occasionally associated with allergic reactions), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis, pigmentation, and a single report of radiation recall dermatitis.

Hepatic toxicity, generally in patients receiving higher doses of the drug than those recommended, has been reported with VePesid (etoposide) . Metabolic acidosis has also been reported in patients receiving higher doses.

The incidences of adverse reactions in the table that follows are derived from multiple data bases from studies in 2,081 patients when VePesid (etoposide) was used either orally or by injection as a single agent.

ADVERSE DRUG EFFECT PERCENT RANGE OF REPORTED INCIDENCE
Hematologic toxicity
  Leukopenia (less than 1,000 WBC/mm3) 3-17
  Leukopenia (less than 4,000 WBC/mm3) 60-91
  Thrombocytopenia (less than 50,000 platelets/mm3) 1-20
  Thrombocytopenia (less than 100,000 platelets/mm3) 22-41
Anemia 0-33
Gastrointestinal toxicity
  Nausea and vomiting 31-43
  Abdominal pain 0-2
  Anorexia 10-13
  Diarrhea 1-13
  Stomatitis 1-6
  Hepatic 0-3
Alopecia 8-66
Peripheral neurotoxicity 1-2
Hypotension 1-2
Allergic reaction 1-2

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Vepesid (Etoposide) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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