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Vumon

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Vumon

INDICATIONS

VUMON (teniposide injection), in combination with other approved anticancer agents, is indicated for induction therapy in patients with refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

NOTE: Contact of undiluted VUMON with plastic equipment or devices used to prepare solutions for infusion may result in softening or cracking and possible drug product leakage. This effect has not been reported with diluted solutions of VUMON.

In order to prevent extraction of the plasticizer DEHP [di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate], solutions of VUMON should be prepared in non-DEHP containing LVP containers such as glass or polyolefin plastic bags or containers.

VUMON solutions should be administered with non-DEHP containing intravenous administration sets.

In one study, childhood ALL patients failing induction therapy with a cytarabine-containing regimen were treated with the combination of VUMON 165 mg/m² and cytarabine 300 mg/m² intravenously, twice weekly for 8 to 9 doses. In another study, patients with childhood ALL refractory to vincristine/prednisone-containing regimens were treated with the combination of VUMON 250 mg/m² and vincristine 1.5 mg/m² intravenously, weekly for 4 to 8 weeks and prednisone 40 mg/m² orally for 28 days.

Adequate data in patients with hepatic insufficiency and/or renal insufficiency are lacking, but dose adjustments may be necessary for patients with significant renal or hepatic impairment.

Preparation and Administration Precautions

Caution should be exercised in handling and preparing the solution of VUMON. Several guidelines on proper handling and disposal of anticancer drugs have been published.1–4 Skin reactions associated with accidental exposure to VUMON may occur. To minimize the risk of dermal exposure, always wear impervious gloves when handling ampules containing VUMON. If VUMON solution contacts the skin, immediately wash the skin thoroughly with soap and water. If VUMON contacts mucous membranes, the membranes should be flushed immediately and thoroughly with water. More information is available in the references listed below.

Preparation for Intravenous Administration

VUMON must be diluted with either 5% Dextrose Injection, USP or 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP, to give final teniposide concentrations of 0.1 mg/mL, 0.2 mg/mL, 0.4 mg/mL, or 1.0 mg/mL. Solutions prepared in 5% Dextrose Injection, USP or 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP at teniposide concentrations of 0.1 mg/mL, 0.2 mg/mL, or 0.4 mg/mL are stable at room temperature for up to 24 hours after preparation. VUMON solutions prepared at a final teniposide concentration of 1.0 mg/mL should be administered within 4 hours of preparation to reduce the potential for precipitation. Refrigeration of VUMON solutions is not recommended. Stability and use times are identical in glass and plastic parenteral solution containers.

Although solutions are chemically stable under the conditions indicated, precipitation of teniposide may occur at the recommended concentrations, especially if the diluted solution is subjected to more agitation than is recommended to prepare the drug solution for parenteral administration. In addition, storage time prior to administration should be minimized and care should be taken to avoid contact of the diluted solution with other drugs or fluids. Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit. Precipitation has been reported during 24-hour infusions of VUMON diluted to teniposide concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/mL, resulting in occlusion of central venous access catheters in several patients. Heparin solution can cause precipitation of teniposide, therefore, the administration apparatus should be flushed thoroughly with 5% Dextrose Injection, USP or 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP before and after administration of VUMON.

Hypotension has been reported following rapid intravenous administration; it is recommended that the VUMON solution be administered over at least a 30- to 60-minute period. VUMON should not be given by rapid intravenous injection.

In a 24-hour study under simulated conditions of actual use of the product relative to dilution strength, diluent and administration rates, dilutions at 0.1 to 1.0 mg/mL were chemically stable for at least 24 hours. Data collected for the presence of the extractable DEHP [di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] from PVC containers show that levels increased with time and concentration of the solutions. The data appeared similar for 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP, and 5% Dextrose Injection, USP. Consequently, the use of PVC containers is not recommended.

Similarly, the use of non-DEHP intravenous administration sets is recommended. Lipid administration sets or low DEHP-containing nitroglycerin sets will keep patient's exposure to DEHP at low levels and are suitable for use. The diluted solutions are chemically and physically compatible with the recommended intravenous administration sets and LVP containers for up to 24 hours at ambient room temperature and lighting conditions. Because of the potential for precipitation, compatibility with other drugs, infusion materials, or intravenous pumps cannot be assured.

Stability

Unopened ampules of VUMON are stable until the date indicated on the package when stored under refrigeration (2°-8°C) in the original package. Freezing does not adversely affect the product.

HOW SUPPLIED

VUMON® (teniposide injection)

NDC 0015-3075-19 50 mg/5 mL sterile, clear, colorless glass ampules individually packaged in a carton.

Storage

Store the unopened ampules under refrigeration (2°-8°C). Retain in original package to protect from light.

REFERENCES

1. NIOSH Alert: Preventing occupational exposures to antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs in healthcare settings. 2004. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2004-165.

2. OSHA Technical Manual, TED 1-0.15A, Section VI: Chapter 2. Controlling Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Drugs. OSHA, 1999. http://www.osha.gov/dts/osta/otm/otm_vi/otm_vi_2.html.

3. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. ASHP guidelines on handling hazardous drugs. Am J Health-Syst Pharm. 2006;63:1172-1193.

4. Polovich M, White JM, Kelleher LO, eds. 2005. Chemotherapy and biotherapy guidelines and recommendations for practice. 2nd ed. Pittsburgh, PA: Oncology Nursing Society.

Manufactured for: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Princeton, NJ 08543 USA. Made in Italy. Rev September 2011

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/7/2011
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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