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Weber-Christian Disease (cont.)

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What is the treatment for Weber-Christian disease?

There is no cure or uniformly effective treatment that works for everyone with Weber-Christian disease. Possible treatments include oral medications that alter the immune-system reaction and decrease overall inflammation. Some patients have had improvement with medications including chloroquine, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, tetracycline, cyclosporine, azathioprine, prednisone, and a host of nonsteroidal medications like ibuprofen and indomethacin.

Accompanying treatments for the symptoms may include additional oral pain medications as well as topical salves to treat and prevent local skin infections.

Overall, when internal organs are inflamed, medicines directed toward the underlying inflammation are considered. In summary, treatment for Weber-Christian disease is nonspecific, and antiinflammatory therapy may not be fully effective for everyone with the disease.

Medically reviewed by Kirkwood Johnston, MD; American Board of Internal Medicine with subspecialty in Rheumatology
REFERENCE:
"Panniculitis: Recognition and diagnosis" uptodate.com


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/19/2013

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Weber-Christian Disease - Symptoms Question: What were the symptoms associated with Weber-Christian disease in you or someone you know?
Weber-Christian Disease - Treatments Question: What types of treatment have you found effective for Weber-Christian disease?
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/weber-christian_disease/article.htm

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