Recommended Topic Related To:

Xgeva

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today expanded the approved uses of Abraxane (paclitaxel protein-bound particles for injectable suspension, albumin-bound) to treat patients with late-stage (metastatic) pancreatic cancer.

Pancreati"...

Xgeva

Xgeva

Xgeva Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving Xgeva (Xgeva)?

You should not receive denosumab if you are allergic to it, or if you have low levels of calcium in your blood (hypocalcemia).

To make sure you can safely use Xgeva, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease or if you are on dialysis.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether denosumab will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

If you are pregnant, your name may be listed on a pregnancy registry. This is to track the outcome of the pregnancy and to evaluate any effects of denosumab on the baby.

It is not known whether denosumab passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. However, this medication may slow the production of breast milk. You should not breast-feed while receiving denosumab.

Some people using denosumab have developed bone loss in the jaw, also called osteonecrosis of the jaw. Symptoms may include jaw pain, swelling, numbness, loose teeth, gum infection, or slow healing after injury or surgery involving the gums. You may be more likely to develop osteonecrosis of the jaw if you have cancer or have been treated with chemotherapy, radiation, or steroids. Other conditions associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw include blood clotting disorders, anemia (low red blood cells), and a pre-existing dental problem.

How is Xgeva given (Xgeva)?

Denosumab is injected under the skin of your stomach, upper thigh, or upper arm. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Xgeva is usually given once every 4 weeks. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may have you take extra calcium and vitamin D while you are being treated with denosumab. Take only the amount of calcium and vitamin D that your doctor has prescribed.

Pay special attention to your dental hygiene. Brush and floss your teeth regularly while receiving this medication. You may need to have a dental exam before you begin treatment with Xgeva. Follow your doctor's instructions.

If you need to have any dental work (especially surgery), tell the dentist ahead of time that you are receiving denosumab. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

If you keep your medication at home, store it in the original container in a refrigerator. Protect from light and do not freeze.

You may take the medicine out of the refrigerator and allow it to reach room temperature before giving the injection. Do not heat the medicine before using.

After you have taken Xgeva out of the refrigerator, you may keep it at room temperature and use it within 14 days. Store in the original container away from heat and light.

Do not shake the medication bottle or you may ruin the medicine. Prepare your dose in a syringe only when you are ready to give yourself an injection. Do not use the medication if it looks cloudy or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Each single use vial (bottle) of this medicine is for one use only. Throw away after one use, even if there is still some medicine left in it after injecting your dose.

Side Effects Centers
A A A

Xgeva - User Reviews

Xgeva User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Xgeva sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Cancer

Get the latest treatment options.

Health Resources
advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations