Xiaflex

Xiaflex Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving collagenase clostridium histolyticum (Xiaflex)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely receive this medication, tell your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, such as hemophilia.

FDA pregnancy category B. Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether collagenase clostridium histolyticum passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How is collagenase clostridium histolyticum given (Xiaflex)?

This medication is injected directly into the "cord" of the affected hand. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

After your injection, do not touch or put pressure on the treated area of the hand for the rest of the day. Keep the treated hand elevated until bedtime.

The day after your injection, your doctor will need to examine your hand to see if your condition has improved. If you still have the cord, your doctor may try to break it by extending your treated finger.

Collagenase clostridium histolyticum is usually given once every 4 weeks and you may receive more than one injection at a time. Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

You may need to wear a splint on your hand for a short time to keep your fingers straight, especially at night. You may also need to perform daily finger exercises. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Call your doctor if you have trouble bending the treated finger after the swelling goes down.

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