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Xopenex HFA

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Xopenex HFA

Xopenex HFA Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Xopenex HFA (levalbuterol tartrate) Inhalation Aerosol is used to treat reversible obstructive airway conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema. It is a bronchodilator. Common side effects include headache, nausea, nervousness, dizziness, shaking (tremor), trouble sleeping, dry mouth, cough, sore throat, or runny nose.

For treatment of acute episodes of bronchospasm or prevention of asthmatic symptoms, the usual dosage of Xopenex HFA Inhalation Aerosol for adults and children 4 years of age and older is 2 inhalations (90 mcg) repeated every 4 to 6 hours. Xopenex HFA may interact with beta-blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), diuretics (water pills), digoxin, other inhaled bronchodilators, caffeine, diet pills, or decongestants. Tell your doctor all medications you use. Xopenex HFA should be used only when prescribed during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Our Xopenex HFA (levalbuterol tartrate) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Xopenex HFA in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • bronchospasm (wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing), especially after starting a new canister of this medicine;
  • chest pain and fast, pounding, or uneven heart beats;
  • low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling); or
  • dangerously high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats, seizure).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • headache, tremors, feeling anxious or nervous;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • cough, runny or stuffy nose;
  • mild nausea, vomiting;
  • dry mouth and throat;
  • muscle pain; or
  • diarrhea.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Xopenex HFA (Levalbuterol Tartrate Inhalation Aerosol) »

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Xopenex HFA Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: Nervousness, dizziness, shaking (tremor), trouble sleeping, headache, nausea, dry mouth, cough, sore throat, or runny nose may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: fast/pounding/irregular heartbeat, muscle cramps/weakness, increased thirst/urination.

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: chest pain, rapid breathing, confusion.

Rarely, this medication has caused severe (rarely fatal), sudden worsening of breathing problems/asthma (paradoxical bronchospasm). If you experience sudden wheezing, get medical help right away.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Xopenex HFA (Levalbuterol Tartrate Inhalation Aerosol)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Xopenex HFA FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Use of XOPENEX HFA may be associated with the following:

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of the drug cannot be directly compared with rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Adult and Adolescents 12 Years of Age and Older

Adverse reaction information concerning XOPENEX HFA in adults and adolescents is derived from two 8-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active- and placebo-controlled trials in 748 adult and adolescent patients with asthma that compared XOPENEX HFA, a marketed albuterol HFA inhaler, and an HFA-134a placebo inhaler. Table 1 lists the incidence of all adverse reactions (whether considered by the investigator to be related or unrelated to drug) from these trials that occurred at a rate of 2% or greater in the group treated with XOPENEX HFA and more frequently than in the HFA-134a placebo inhaler group.

Table 1: Adverse Reaction Incidence (% of Patients) in Two 8-Week Clinical Trials in Adults and Adolescents > 12 Years of Age*

Body System Preferred Term XOPENEX HFA 90 mcg
(n=403)
Racemic Albuterol HFA 180 mcg
(n=179)
Placebo
(n=166)
Body as a Whole Pain 4 3 4
Central Nervous System Dizziness 3 1 2
Respiratory System Asthma 9 7 6
Pharyngitis 8 2 2
Rhinitis 7 2 3
*This table includes all adverse reactions (whether considered by the investigator to be related or unrelated to drug) from these trials that occurred at a rate of 2% or greater in the group treated with XOPENEX HFA and more frequently than in the HFA-134a placebo inhaler group.

Adverse reactions reported by less than 2% and at least 2 or more of the adolescent and adult patients receiving XOPENEX HFA and by a greater proportion than receiving HFA-134a placebo inhaler include cyst, flu syndrome, viral infection, constipation, gastroenteritis, myalgia, hypertension, epistaxis, lung disorder, acne, herpes simplex, conjunctivitis, ear pain, dysmenorrhea, hematuria, and vaginal moniliasis. There were no significant laboratory abnormalities observed in these studies.

Pediatric Patients 4 to 11 Years of Age

Adverse reaction information concerning XOPENEX HFA in children is derived from a 4-week, randomized, double-blind trial of XOPENEX HFA, a marketed albuterol HFA inhaler, and an HFA-134a placebo inhaler in 150 children aged 4 to 11 years with asthma. Table 2 lists the adverse reactions reported for XOPENEX HFA in children at a rate of 2% or greater and more frequently than for placebo.

Table 2: Adverse Reaction Incidence (% of Patients) in a 4-Week Clinical Trials in Children 4-11 Years*

Body System Preferred Term XOPENEX HFA 90 mcg
(n=76)
Racemic Albuterol HFA 180 mcg
(n=39)
Placebo
(n=35)
Body as a Whole Accidental injury 9 10 6
Digestive System Vomiting 11 8 6
Respiratory System Bronchitis 3 0 0
Pharyngitis 7 13 6
* This table includes all adverse reactions (whether considered by the investigator to be related or unrelated to drug) from the trial that occurred at a rate of 2% or greater in the group treated with XOPENEX HFA and more frequently than in the HFA-134a placebo inhaler group.

The incidence of systemic beta-adrenergic adverse reactions (e.g., tremor, nervousness) was low and comparable across all treatment groups, including placebo.

Post-marketing Experience

In addition to the adverse reactions reported in clinical trials, the following adverse reactions have been observed in postapproval use of levalbuterol inhalation solution. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure. These events have been chosen for inclusion due to their seriousness, their frequency of reporting, or their likely beta-mediated mechanism: angioedema, anaphylaxis, arrhythmias (including atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, extrasystoles), asthma, chest pain, cough increased, dyspnea, metabolic acidosis, nausea, nervousness, rash, tachycardia, tremor, urticaria.

In addition, XOPENEX HFA, like other sympathomimetic agents, can cause adverse reactions such as hypertension, angina, vertigo, central nervous system stimulation, sleeplessness, headache, and drying or irritation of the oropharynx.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Xopenex HFA (Levalbuterol Tartrate Inhalation Aerosol) »

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Xopenex HFA - User Reviews

Xopenex HFA User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Xopenex HFA sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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