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Zoladex

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Zoladex 10.8 mg

Disclaimer

Zoladex 10.8 mg Consumer

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

GOSERELIN - IMPLANT

(GOE-se-REL-in)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Zoladex

USES: Goserelin is used in men to treat prostate cancer. It is used in women to treat certain breast cancers or a certain uterus disorder (endometriosis). It is also used in women to thin the lining of the uterus (endometrium) in preparation for a procedure to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of treatment.

Goserelin is similar to a natural hormone made by the body (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-LHRH). It works by decreasing testosterone hormones in men and estrogen hormones in women. This effect helps to slow or stop the growth of certain cancer cells and uterine tissue that need these hormones to grow and spread.

The 10.8-milligram syringe should not be used in women.

OTHER USES: This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This medication may also be used to stop early puberty in children.

HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start using goserelin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

This medication is an implant that slowly releases hormone into your body. It is placed by a health care professional by injection under the skin of the lower abdomen below the navel. The implant itself will be completely absorbed into the body over weeks or months.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy.

Receive this medication as directed by your doctor. The 3.6-milligram syringe is usually injected every 4 weeks. The 10.8-milligram syringe is usually injected every 12 weeks. Follow the dosing schedule carefully to get the most benefit from the drug. To help you remember, mark your calendar to keep track of when to receive the next dose. Do not stop this medication without your doctor's approval.

During the first few weeks of treatment, your hormone levels will actually increase before they decrease. This is a normal response by your body to this drug. This effect may result in new symptoms or worsening of symptoms (e.g., pain, tumor size) for the first few weeks.

In women, it is expected that menstrual periods will stop when this medication is used regularly. Tell your doctor promptly if regular periods continue after 2 months of treatment with goserelin.

Usually, this medication will not need to be removed because the implant will be slowly and completely absorbed by your body. However, in the unlikely event that you have serious side effects or other problems, your doctor may remove this medication.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

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Zoladex 10.8 mg - User Reviews

Zoladex 10.8 mg User Reviews

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