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Admelog

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/27/2018
Admelog Side Effects Center

Last reviewed on RxList 11/27/2018

Admelog (insulin lispro injection) is a rapid-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients 3 years and older with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common side effects of Admelog include:

The dosage of Admelog is individualized based on the route of administration and the individual's metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Admelog may interact with antidiabetic agents, salicylates, sulfonamide antibiotics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, fluoxetine, pramlintide, disopyramide, fibrates, propoxyphene, pentoxifylline, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blocking agents, somatostatin analogs, corticosteroids, isoniazid, niacin, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, danazol, diuretics, sympathomimetic agents, somatropin, atypical antipsychotics, glucagon, protease inhibitors, thyroid hormones, beta-blockers, clonidine, lithium salts, alcohol, pentamidine, guanethidine, and reserpine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Admelog; it is unknown how it would affect a fetus. There are risks to the mother and fetus associated with poorly controlled diabetes in pregnancy. It is unknown if Admelog passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Admelog (insulin lispro injection), for Subcutaneous or Intravenous Use Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Diabetes: What Raises and Lowers Your Blood Sugar Level? See Slideshow
Admelog Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions are also discussed elsewhere:

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Two clinical trials with ADMELOG were conducted: one in patients with type 1 diabetes and one in patients with type 2 diabetes [see Clinical Studies].

The data in Table 1 reflect the exposure of 252 patients with type 1 diabetes to ADMELOG with mean exposure duration of 49 weeks. The type 1 diabetes population had the following characteristics: Mean age was 43 years and mean duration of diabetes was 20 years. Fifty-nine percent were male, 80% were White, 6% were Black or African American and 7% were Hispanic. At baseline, the mean eGFR was 90 mL/min/1.73 m² and 49% of patients had eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m². The mean BMI was 26 kg/m². The mean HbA1c at baseline was 8.07%.

Two hundred fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes were exposed to ADMELOG with mean exposure duration of 25 weeks. The type 2 diabetes population had the following characteristics: Mean age was 62 years and mean duration of diabetes was 17 years. Fifty-four percent were male, 90% were White, 6% were Black or African American and 17% were Hispanic. At baseline, the mean eGFR was 77 mL/min/1.73 m² and 27% of patients had eGFR ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m². The mean BMI was 32 kg/m². The mean HbA1c at baseline was 7.99%.

Common adverse reactions were defined as reactions occurring in ≥5% of the population studied.

Common adverse reactions (other than hypoglycemia) during a clinical trial in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are listed in Table 1. In a 26-week clinical trial in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, no adverse reactions (other than hypoglycemia) occurring in ≥5% of ADMELOG-treated patients (n=253) were observed.

Table 1: Adverse Reactions Occurring in ≥5% of ADMELOG-Treated Patients with Type 1 Diabetes in a 52-Week Trial

  ADMELOG + Insulin Glargine (100 units/mL), %
(n=252)
Nasopharyngitis 13.1%
Upper respiratory tract infection 6.0%

Severe Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is the most commonly observed adverse reaction in patients using insulin, including ADMELOG [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. The rates of reported hypoglycemia depend on the definition of hypoglycemia used, diabetes type, insulin dose, intensity of glucose control, background therapies, and other intrinsic and extrinsic patient factors. For these reasons, comparing rates of hypoglycemia in clinical trials for ADMELOG with the incidence of hypoglycemia for other products may be misleading and also, may not be representative of hypoglycemia rates that will occur in clinical practice.

In the ADMELOG trials, severe hypoglycemia was defined as an event requiring assistance of another person to actively administer carbohydrate, glucagon, or other resuscitative actions. The incidence of severe hypoglycemia in patients receiving ADMELOG with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus was 13.5% at 52 weeks and 2.4% at 26 weeks, respectively [see Clinical Studies].

Insulin Initiation And Intensification Of Glucose Control

Intensification or rapid improvement in glucose control has been associated with a transitory, reversible ophthalmologic refraction disorder, worsening of diabetic retinopathy, and acute painful peripheral neuropathy. However, long-term glycemic control decreases the risk of diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy.

Lipodystrophy

Long-term use of insulin, including ADMELOG, can cause lipodystrophy at the site of repeated insulin injections or infusion. Lipodystrophy includes lipohypertrophy (thickening of adipose tissue) and lipoatrophy (thinning of adipose tissue), and may affect insulin absorption. Rotate insulin injection or infusion sites within the same region to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Weight Gain

Weight gain can occur with insulin therapy, including ADMELOG, and has been attributed to the anabolic effects of insulin and the decrease in glucosuria.

Peripheral Edema

Insulin, including ADMELOG, may cause sodium retention and edema, particularly if previously poor metabolic control is improved by intensified insulin therapy.

Adverse Reactions With Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII)

In a randomized, open-label crossover study in adult patients with type 1 diabetes treated over two 4-week periods, the incidence of infusion set occlusions (defined as failure to correct hyperglycemia [plasma glucose ≥300 mg/dL] by insulin bolus via insulin pump) in ADMELOG-treated patients (n=25) was evaluated. Infusion set occlusions were reported by 24% of patients.

In a randomized, 16-week, open-label, parallel design study of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, adverse event reports related to infusion-site reactions for another insulin lispro product, 100 units/mL, occurred in 21% of patients. The most frequently reported infusion site adverse events were infusion site erythema and infusion site reaction.

Allergic Reactions

Local allergy

As with any insulin therapy, patients taking ADMELOG may experience redness, swelling, or itching at the site of the injection. These minor reactions usually resolve in a few days to a few weeks, but in some occasions may require discontinuation of ADMELOG. In some instances, these reactions may be related to factors other than insulin, such as irritants in a skin cleansing agent or poor injection technique.

Systemic Allergy

Severe, life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, may occur with any insulin, including ADMELOG. Generalized allergy to insulin may cause whole body rash (including pruritus), dyspnea, wheezing, hypotension, tachycardia, or diaphoresis.

Localized reactions and generalized myalgias have been reported with injected metacresol, which is an excipient in ADMELOG [see CONTRAINDICATIONS].

Immunogenicity

Consistent with the potentially immunogenic properties of protein and peptide pharmaceuticals, patients treated with ADMELOG may develop anti-insulin antibodies. The detection of antibody formation is highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of the assay and may be influenced by several factors such as assay methodology, sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medication, and underlying disease. For these reasons, the incidence of antibodies to ADMELOG in the studies described below cannot be directly compared with the incidence of antibodies in other studies or to other products.

In a 52-week study of ADMELOG in type 1 diabetes patients, 49.4% were positive at baseline and 22.6% had treatment-emergent ADA (i.e., either new ADA, or increase in titer of at least 4-fold).

In a 26-week study of ADMELOG in type 2 diabetes patients, 26.4% were positive at baseline and 18.8% had treatment-emergent ADA (i.e., either new ADA, or increase in titer of at least 4-fold).

Postmarketing Experience

The following additional adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of another insulin lispro product, 100 units/mL. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Medication errors in which other insulins have been accidentally substituted for another insulin lispro product, 100 units/mL, have been identified during postapproval use [see Patient Counseling Information].

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Admelog (Insulin Lispro Injection)

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Related Resources for Admelog

© Admelog Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Admelog Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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