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Adoxa vs. Malarone

Are Adoxa and Malarone the Same Thing?

Adoxa (doxycycline) and Malarone (atovaquone and proguanil hcl) are used to prevent malaria, a disease caused by parasites. Parasites that cause malaria typically enter the body through the bite of a mosquito.

Adoxa is also used to treat many different bacterial infections, such as urinary tract infections, acne, gonorrhea, and chlamydia, periodontitis (gum disease), and others. Adoxa is also used to treat blemishes, bumps, and acne-like lesions caused by rosacea.

Adoxa and Malarone belong to different drug classes. Adoxa is a tetracycline antibiotic and Malarone is a combination of two antimalarial medications.

Side effects of Adoxa and Malarone that are similar include stomach upset, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and itching.

Side effects of Adoxa that are different from Malarone include skin rash and vaginal itching or discharge.

Side effects of Malarone that are different from Adoxa include abdominal pain, headache, weakness, loss of appetite, and dizziness.

Both Adoxa and Malarone may interact with blood thinners.

Adoxa may also interact with cholesterol-lowering medications, isotretinoin, tretinoin, antacids, products containing bismuth subsalicylate; minerals such as iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements; and penicillin antibiotics.

Malarone may also interact with rifabutin, rifampin, tetracycline, and metoclopramide.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Adoxa?

Common side effects of Adoxa include:

  • stomach upset,
  • diarrhea,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • skin rash or itching, or
  • vaginal itching or discharge

What Are Possible Side Effects of Malarone?

Common side effects of Malarone include:

What Is Adoxa?

Adoxa (doxycycline) is a tetracycline antibiotic used to treat many different bacterial infections, such as urinary tract infections, acne, gonorrhea, and chlamydia, periodontitis (gum disease), and others. Adoxa is also used to treat blemishes, bumps, and acne-like lesions caused by rosacea.

What Is Malarone?

Malarone (tetracycline HCl) Capsules are antibiotics indicated to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. In severe acne, adjunctive therapy with Malarone may be useful.

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What Drugs Interact With Adoxa?

Adoxa may interact with cholesterol-lowering medications, isotretinoin, tretinoin, antacids, products containing bismuth subsalicylate, minerals such as iron, zinc, calcium, magnesium, over-the-counter vitamin and mineral supplements, blood thinners, or malarone antibiotics. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Adoxa is not recommended for use during pregnancy. It may harm a fetus. Consult your doctor to discuss using birth control while taking this medication. This drug passes into breast milk but is unlikely to harm a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

What Drugs Interact With Malarone?

Malarone may interact with penicillin or other bactericidal antibiotics, anticoagulants, methoxyflurane; antacids containing aluminum, calcium or magnesium; preparations containing iron, zinc, or sodium bicarbonate; and oral contraceptives. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Malarone is generally not recommended for use during pregnancy; it may harm a fetus.

How Should Adoxa Be Taken?

The usual adult dose of oral Adoxa is 200 mg on the first day of treatment (taken 100 mg every 12 hours or 50 mg every 6 hours) followed by a maintenance dose of 100 mg/day. The maintenance dose may be taken as a single dose or as 50 mg every 12 hours.

How Should Malarone Be Taken?

The usual adult daily dose of Malarone is 1 gram as 500 mg twice daily or 250 mg four times a day.

QUESTION

Bowel regularity means a bowel movement every day. See Answer
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Reviewed on 7/15/2019
References


DailyMed. Adoxa Prescribing Information.

https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=0cecc43f-cc40-4c48-9e43-ae8d77af4e49&audience=consumer

DailyMed. Malarone Product Information.

https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=fc22e8d8-3bfb-4f70-a599-dd81262a4887&audience=consumer
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