Anjeso

Last updated on RxList: 7/30/2021
Anjeso Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

What Is Anjeso?

Anjeso (meloxicam) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used adults to manage moderate-to-severe pain, alone or in combination with non-NSAID analgesics.

What Are Side Effects of Anjeso?

Side effects of Anjeso include:

  • constipation,
  • GGT increased, and
  • anemia

Dosage for Anjeso

The dose of of Anjeso is 30 mg once daily, administered by intravenous bolus injection over 15 seconds.

Anjeso In Children

The safety and efficacy of Anjeso has not been established in pediatric patients.

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Anjeso?

Anjeso may interact with other medicines such as:

  • warfarin,
  • aspirin,
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),
  • serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs),
  • angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,
  • angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs),
  • beta-blockers,
  • diuretics,
  • lithium,
  • methotrexate,
  • cyclosporine,
  • other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs),
  • aspirin,
  • pemetrexed, and
  • CYP2C9 inhibitors (such as amiodarone, fluconazole, and sulphaphenazole)

Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

Anjeso During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Anjeso; use of NSAIDs, including Anjeso, during the third trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus. Avoid use of Anjeso after 30 weeks' gestation. It is unknown if Anjeso passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Additional Information

Our Anjeso (meloxicam) Injection, for Intravenous Use Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

What Is Anjeso?

Anjeso (meloxicam) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used adults to manage moderate-to-severe pain, alone or in combination with non-NSAID analgesics.

What Are Side Effects of Anjeso?

Side effects of Anjeso include:

  • constipation,
  • GGT increased, and
  • anemia

Dosage for Anjeso

The dose of of Anjeso is 30 mg once daily, administered by intravenous bolus injection over 15 seconds.

Anjeso In Children

The safety and efficacy of Anjeso has not been established in pediatric patients.

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Anjeso?

Anjeso may interact with other medicines such as:

  • warfarin,
  • aspirin,
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),
  • serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs),
  • angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,
  • angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs),
  • beta-blockers,
  • diuretics,
  • lithium,
  • methotrexate,
  • cyclosporine,
  • other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs),
  • aspirin,
  • pemetrexed, and
  • CYP2C9 inhibitors (such as amiodarone, fluconazole, and sulphaphenazole)

Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

Anjeso During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Anjeso; use of NSAIDs, including Anjeso, during the third trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus. Avoid use of Anjeso after 30 weeks' gestation. It is unknown if Anjeso passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Additional Information

Our Anjeso (meloxicam) Injection, for Intravenous Use Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

What Is Anjeso?

Anjeso (meloxicam) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used adults to manage moderate-to-severe pain, alone or in combination with non-NSAID analgesics.

What Are Side Effects of Anjeso?

Side effects of Anjeso include:

  • constipation,
  • GGT increased, and
  • anemia

Dosage for Anjeso

The dose of of Anjeso is 30 mg once daily, administered by intravenous bolus injection over 15 seconds.

Anjeso In Children

The safety and efficacy of Anjeso has not been established in pediatric patients.

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Anjeso?

Anjeso may interact with other medicines such as:

  • warfarin,
  • aspirin,
  • selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),
  • serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs),
  • angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors,
  • angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs),
  • beta-blockers,
  • diuretics,
  • lithium,
  • methotrexate,
  • cyclosporine,
  • other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs),
  • aspirin,
  • pemetrexed, and
  • CYP2C9 inhibitors (such as amiodarone, fluconazole, and sulphaphenazole)

Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

Anjeso During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Anjeso; use of NSAIDs, including Anjeso, during the third trimester of pregnancy increases the risk of premature closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus. Avoid use of Anjeso after 30 weeks' gestation. It is unknown if Anjeso passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Additional Information

Our Anjeso (meloxicam) Injection, for Intravenous Use Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Anjeso Consumer Information

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash with blistering and peeling).

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of a heart attack or stroke: chest pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, sudden numbness or weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, leg swelling, feeling short of breath.

Stop using meloxicam and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild;
  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion);
  • swelling or rapid weight gain;
  • signs of stomach bleeding--bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • liver problems--nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, flu-like symptoms, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • low red blood cells (anemia)--pale skin, unusual tiredness, feeling light-headed, cold hands and feet; or
  • kidney problems--little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath.

Common side effects may include:

  • stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, heartburn;
  • diarrhea, constipation, gas;
  • dizziness; or
  • cold symptoms, flu symptoms.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Anjeso (Meloxicam Injection)

QUESTION

Medically speaking, the term "myalgia" refers to what type of pain? See Answer
Anjeso Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions are discussed in greater detail in the other sections of the labeling:

  • Cardiovascular Thrombotic Events [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • GI Bleeding, Ulceration, and Perforation [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Hepatotoxicity [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Hypertension [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Heart Failure and Edema [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Renal Toxicity and Hyperkalemia [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Anaphylactic Reactions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Serious Skin Reactions [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]
  • Hematologic Toxicity [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

During clinical development, 1426 patients were exposed to ANJESO in controlled and open-label Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials. ANJESO was studied across a range of surgical procedures, including bunionectomy, abdominoplasty, soft tissue surgery, total knee replacement surgery, gynecologic surgery, complex foot surgery and total hip replacement surgery. In these trials, 381 patients received a single dose of ANJESO and 1045 patients received multiple doses of ANJESO daily for up to 7 days. The incidence rates of adverse reactions listed in Table 1 are derived from the three Phase 3 trials comparing ANJESO to placebo in patients who may have also received opioid rescue medication.

Table 1: Proportion of Patients Experiencing Common Adverse Reactions in Placebo-Controlled Phase 3 Clinical Trials occurring in greater than or equal to 2% of Patients Treated with ANJESO and at a greater frequency than Placebo

Adverse ReactionANJESO
N=748
Placebo
N=393
Constipation57 (7.6%)24 (6.1%)
Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Increased21 (2.8%)6 (1.5%)
Anemia18 (2.4%)4 (1.0%)

The following is a list of adverse drug reactions occurring in <2% of patients receiving ANJESO in clinical trials.

Table 2: Additional Adverse Reactions for ANJESO

Body as a Wholeasthenia, back pain, edema, fatigue, hyperthermia, infusion site reactions (including pain, pruritus, phlebitis and thrombosis), muscle spasms, non-cardiac chest pain, pyrexia, vaginal discharge, weight decrease
Central and Peripheral Nervous Systemdisturbance in attention, migraine, presyncope, somnolence, syncope
Gastrointestinalabdominal discomfort, abdominal distension, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dry mouth, epigastric discomfort, flatulence, frequent bowel movements, gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, gastrointestinal pain, rectal hemorrhage
Heart Rate and Rhythmtachycardia
Hematologicincreased bleeding time, neutropenia, thrombocytosis
Infections and Infestationscellulitis, gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection, vulval abscess
Liver and Biliary Systemliver function test abnormal
Metabolic and Nutritionalhypokalemia, hypomagnesemia
Procedural Complicationsincision site hemorrhage, incision site rash, wound dehiscence, wound hematoma
Psychiatricconfusion, hallucination, insomnia
Respiratorydyspnea, epistaxis, hypoxia, oropharyngeal pain
Skin and Appendagescontact dermatitis, ecchymosis, rash
Urinary Systempollakiuria, urinary retention

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of meloxicam. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Adverse reactions reported in worldwide post marketing experience or the literature include: acute urinary retention; agranulocytosis; alterations in mood (such as mood elevation); anaphylactoid reactions including shock; erythema multiforme; exfoliative dermatitis; interstitial nephritis; jaundice; liver failure; Stevens-Johnson syndrome; toxic epidermal necrolysis, and infertility female.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Anjeso (Meloxicam Injection)

© Anjeso Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Anjeso Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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