Are Protein Powders Good for You?

Reviewed on 6/3/2021

Protein drinks
Protein powders come under the supplement category, which doesn’t come under the regulation of the United States Food and Drug Administration. Hence, it solely depends on the manufacturer to ensure that its products aren’t hazardous.

While many people believe they might need protein powders, there is no need for the average adult to use protein powders, except if they are:

  • An athlete
  • A vegetarian (diet with no meat)
  • A vegan (diet with no meat or animal protein)

Protein powders come under the supplement category, which doesn’t come under the regulation of the United States Food and Drug Administration. Hence, it solely depends on the manufacturer to ensure that its products aren’t hazardous.

Some of the benefits of taking protein powder include

  • Provides sufficient protein to the body, thus helping with weight gain in those who are underweight.
  • Taking protein before a workout helps make amino acids available to the body and increase muscle mass.
  • Helps repair damaged muscles, especially when taken after a workout.
  • Helps repair skin and tissue from wounds or surgery.
  • Provides extra nutrition to people with long-term illnesses and needs.

Some of the side effects of protein powders include

  • They may have high-calorie content, which causes excess weight gain.
  • They may have artificial flavors, sweeteners, or added sugar.
  • They may have possible contaminants because they do not undergo any strict regulation.
  • They may cause digestive issues, such as
  • Excess proteins tax the kidneys.

What does protein powder comprise?

Protein powders are powdered forms of protein mainly obtained from plants, such as

  • Soybeans
  • Peas
  • Rice
  • Potatoes
  • Hemp
  • Eggs
  • Milk

Besides, the powder may also include additional agents, such as

Supplements aimed for muscle building contain relatively more protein compared to supplements used for weight loss.

How much protein does a person require?

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of protein for most healthy people is 0.36 grams of protein per pound

For someone who weighs 100 pounds, this translates to roughly 36 grams of protein. A 150-pound person requires about 55 grams of protein. 

Certain athletes undergoing intense training may enhance their progress by consuming more than double the RDA, but this doesn’t apply to most people.

Most people can add an extra 6 grams of protein to their diet from each of the following:

  • One egg
  • One half-cup of chickpeas
  • A small handful of nuts

People may get 30 grams of protein from a piece of chicken or fish. For most people, it is easy to reach their recommended amounts through their usual diet. 

On average, Americans consume 65 to 90 grams of protein each day (women younger than 19 years of age and seniors older than 70 years of age are more likely to be at risk for low protein intake).

When do you require more protein in your diet?

There may be some crucial moments when protein requirement may be more

  • When growing, particularly during teenage years
  • When starting to workout
  • When planning to intensify the workout
  • When recovering from an injury
  • If changing the diet, such as becoming a vegan or vegetarian
  • If pregnant

Protein requirements can be met by taking a protein-rich meal or protein powder. If choosing to take protein powder, be mindful of the total daily protein intake. 

Some of these powders already have 80 grams of protein per serving. The body may not require that much protein, and too much protein can cause excess pressure on the kidney and liver

Also, pregnant women should consult their physician before taking protein powders on how much is needed and from what sources.

QUESTION

Weight loss occurs in the belly before anywhere else. See Answer

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors

References
WebMD. Do You Need Protein Powders? https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/features/protein-powder

Harvard Health Publishing. The Hidden Dangers of Protein Powders. April 10, 2020. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-hidden-dangers-of-protein-powders

Weinandy L. Is Protein Powder Good for You? The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/blog/is-protein-powder-good-for-you

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors