What Temperature Is the Best for Roasting Vegetables?

Reviewed on 3/24/2021

Roasting temperature

The recommended way to roast vegetables is to set the temperature anywhere between 350 and 500°F. However, 400°F is usually ideal for roasting vegetables.
The recommended way to roast vegetables is to set the temperature anywhere between 350 and 500°F. However, 400°F is usually ideal for roasting vegetables.

The recommended way to roast vegetables is to set the temperature anywhere between 350 and 500°F. However, 400°F is usually ideal for roasting vegetables.

  • It’s important to preheat your oven or pan. If you don’t do that, you’ll get mushy vegetables.
  • Set your oven to 400 to 450°F for about 10 minutes and then add your veggies. That way your vegetables have the chance to be caramelized properly and get crispy.

The time duration may change.

Under 20 minutes

  • Asparagus
  • Bell peppers
  • Green beans
  • Mushrooms
  • Summer squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Zucchini

About 20 to 30 minutes

  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Fennel
  • Garlic cloves
  • Onions
  • Snap peas
  • Turnips

30 minutes or longer

  • Beets
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Carrots
  • Parsnips
  • Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Sweet potatoes

Common rules of roasting

  • Use a good pan. If you have a sturdy rimmed baking sheet, you are all set. Choose one that is as large as possible to fit in your oven.
  • Don’t overcrowd the pan. If your vegetables are overlapping, you will create steam, and this is a whole different cooking method. If you want to brown your vegetables, it can’t happen if they are steaming. Make two batches if you have to, but don’t put too many vegetables in at once.
  • Toss the vegetables in oil in a bowl or plastic bag before putting them on the baking sheet. This will produce an even coating of oil on all parts of the vegetables. Do not use too much oil in an attempt to get the vegetables coated. It does take a few minutes, but it is worth it.
  • Use foil to line the baking pan shiny side up. The shiny side will help with browning. The foil will also help clean up.
  • Flip the vegetables (if needed) only when they are good and brown. Impatience will result in less than desirable vegetables. Caramelization may take time. If the vegetables stick to the pan/foil, they need more time.

Why roast vegetables?

Roasted vegetables are healthy. They’re low in fat, high in fiber and rich in vitamins and minerals. There are a few other reasons

  • Roasted vegetables retain nutrients. Some of the vitamins in vegetables (such as B vitamins and vitamin C) are water soluble, which means that when submerged in water, nutrients can seep out of the veggies.
  • Roasted vegetables are flavorful. Roasting vegetables in the oven with simple seasoning—salt, pepper, and olive oil—require little prep work, yet you reap rich, flavorful results. From earthy sweet potatoes to mellow eggplant to sweet carrots, roasting is an effective way to bring out the natural flavor of vegetables.
  • Roasted vegetables have a pleasant texture. Roasting vegetables in the oven gives them a unique texture: a soft, tender interior and a slightly crispy exterior. This contrast in textures gives the palate the same satisfying crunch and feel as fried vegetables, such as French fries, but with a fraction of the fat.
  • Roasted vegetables can be prepared with very little fat. You can control how much fat goes into the dish. Roasted vegetables taste great with a little bit of olive oil, but it is not necessary. You can add as much or as little oil as you are comfortable with in your eating plan.

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References
Medscape Medical Reference

UT Extension


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