Boostrix vs. Adacel

Are Boostrix and Adacel the Same Thing?

Boostrix (tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine, adsorbed) (also called Tdap) and Adacel (tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed) are immunizations used to help prevent tetanus (lockjaw), diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough) in people who are at least 10 years old.

Adacel is a "booster" vaccine given to maintain protection (immunity) against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis in children and adults aged 11 to 64 years who have been vaccinated for these diseases in the past.

Side effects of Boostrix and Adacel that are similar include headache, tiredness, body aches, nausea, diarrhea, fever, chills, vomiting, injection site reactions (pain, swelling, redness, tenderness), and sore or swollen joints.

Both Boostrix and Adacel may interact with steroids, medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, and medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Boostrix?

Common side effects of Boostrix include:

  • injection site reactions (pain, swelling, tenderness, or redness),
  • headache,
  • tiredness,
  • body aches,
  • nausea,
  • diarrhea,
  • fever,
  • chills,
  • vomiting, or
  • sore or swollen joints

What Are Possible Side Effects of Adacel?

Common side effects of Adacel include:

  • headache,
  • tiredness,
  • body aches,
  • nausea,
  • diarrhea,
  • fever,
  • chills,
  • vomiting,
  • injection site reactions (pain, swelling, redness, tenderness), or
  • sore/swollen joints or joint pain.

Infrequently, temporary symptoms such as fainting, dizziness, lightheadedness, vision changes, numbness or tingling, or seizure-like movements have happened after vaccine injections such as Adacel. Tell your doctor if you have any of these symptoms soon after receiving an injection of Adacel.

What Is Boostrix?

Boostrix (tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine, adsorbed) adult vaccine (also called Tdap) is an immunization used to help prevent:

  • tetanus,
  • diphtheria, and
  • pertussis

What Is Adacel?

Adacel (tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed) is a "booster" vaccine given to maintain protection (immunity) against diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), and pertussis (whooping cough) in children and adults aged 11 to 64 years who have been vaccinated for these diseases in the past.

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What Drugs Interact With Boostrix?

Boostrix may interact with steroids, medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection, or medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use, and other vaccines you recently received. Boostrix should be used only when prescribed during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

What Drugs Interact With Adacel?

Adacel may interact with oral, nasal, inhaled, or injectable steroids; medications to treat psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders; or medicines to treat or prevent organ transplant rejection. Tell your doctor all medications you use. During pregnancy, Adacel should be used only when prescribed. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

How Should Boostrix Be Taken?

Boostrix is administered as a single dose 0.5-mL intramuscular injection into the deltoid muscle of the upper arm.

How Should Adacel Be Taken?

Adacel vaccine should be administered as a single injection of one dose (0.5 mL) given intramuscularly (under the skin). Before receiving this vaccine, tell the doctor about all vaccines you have recently received.

Disclaimer

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Drug information found in the drug comparisons published on RxList.com is primarily sourced from the FDA drug information. The drug comparison information found in this article does not contain any data from clinical trials with human participants or animals performed by any of the drug manufacturers comparing the drugs.

The drug comparisons information provided does not cover every potential use, warning, drug interaction, side effect, or adverse or allergic reaction. RxList.com assumes no responsibility for any healthcare administered to a person based on the information found on this site.

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References
GSK. Boostrix Product Information.

https://gsksource.com/pharma/content/gsk/source/us/en/brands/boostrix/pi/po.html

FDA. Adacel Product Information

https://www.fda.gov/files/vaccines%2C%20blood%20%26%20biologics/published/Package-Insert---Adacel.pdf

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