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Buprenex

Last reviewed on RxList: 12/21/2020
Buprenex Side Effects Center

What Is Buprenex?

Buprenex (buprenorphine hydrochloride) injectable is a narcotic drug indicated for the relief of moderate to severe pain.

What Are Side Effects of Buprenex?

Side effects of Buprenex include:

Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Buprenex including:

  • weak or shallow breathing,
  • lightheadedness,
  • fainting,
  • blue lips or fingernails,
  • confusion,
  • feelings of extreme happiness,
  • fast or slow heart rate, or
  • urinating less than usual or not at all.

Dosage for Buprenex

The usual dosage for persons 13 years of age and over is 1 ml Buprenex given by deep intramuscular or slow (over at least 2 minutes) intravenous injection at up to 6-hour intervals, as needed.

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Buprenex?

Buprenex may interact with alcohol, other narcotic pain medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing, dexamethasone, imatinib, isoniazid, nefazodone, St. John's wort, antibiotics, antifungal medications, barbiturates, blood thinners, heart or blood pressure medications, HIV/AIDS medicines, MAO inhibitors, medicines to treat narcolepsy, phenothiazines, or seizure medications. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

Buprenex During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Buprenex. It is not known whether Buprenex is harmful to an unborn baby. Use of high doses of sublingual buprenorphine in pregnant women showed that buprenorphine passes into the mother's milk. Breastfeeding is therefore not advised in nursing mothers treated with Buprenex.

Additional Information

Our Buprenex Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Buprenex Consumer Information

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Opioid medicine can slow or stop your breathing, and death may occur. A person caring for you should seek emergency medical attention if you have slow breathing with long pauses, blue colored lips, or if you are hard to wake up.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • noisy breathing, sighing, shallow breathing, breathing that stops during sleep;
  • slow heartbeat or weak pulse;
  • blue lips or fingernails;
  • severe constipation;
  • confusion, feelings of extreme happiness;
  • little or no urination; or
  • low cortisol levels-- nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, dizziness, worsening tiredness or weakness.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Serious side effects may be more likely in older adults and those who are overweight, malnourished, or debilitated.

Long-term use of opioid medication may affect fertility (ability to have children) in men or women. It is not known whether opioid effects on fertility are permanent.

Common side effects may include:

  • drowsiness;
  • constipation;
  • dizziness, spinning sensation;
  • nausea, vomiting;
  • increased sweating;
  • headache; or
  • blurred vision, double vision.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Buprenex (Buprenorphine)

QUESTION

Medically speaking, the term "myalgia" refers to what type of pain? See Answer
Buprenex Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

The most frequent side effect in clinical studies involving 1,133 patients was sedation which occurred in approximately two-thirds of the patients. Although sedated, these patients could easily be aroused to an alert state.

 

Other less frequent adverse reactions occurring in 5-10% of the patients were:
Nausea Dizziness/Vertigo
Occurring in 1-5% of the patients:
Sweating
Hypotension
Vomiting Miosis
Headache
Nausea/Vomiting
Hypoventilation

The following adverse reactions were reported to have occurred in less than 1% of the patients:

CNS Effect: confusion, blurred vision, euphoria, weakness/fatigue, dry mouth, nervousness, depression, slurred speech, paresthesia.

Cardiovascular: hypertension, tachycardia, bradycardia.

Gastrointestinal: constipation.

Respiratory: dyspnea, cyanosis.

Dermatological: pruritus.

Ophthalmological: diplopia, visual abnormalities.

Miscellaneous: injection site reaction, urinary retention, dreaming, flushing/warmth, chills/cold, tinnitus, conjunctivitis, Wenckebach block, and psychosis.

Other effects observed infrequently include malaise, hallucinations, depersonalization, coma, dyspepsia, flatulence, apnea, rash, amblyopia, tremor, and pallor.

The following reactions have been reported to occur rarely: loss of appetite, dysphoria/agitation, diarrhea, urticaria, and convulsions/lack of muscle coordination.

Allergic Reactions: Cases of acute and chronic hypersensitivity to buprenorphine have been reported both in clinical trials and in the post-marketing experience of Buprenex and other buprenorphine- containing products. The most common signs and symptoms include rashes, hives, and pruritus. Cases of bronchospasm, angioneurotic edema, and anaphylactic shock have been reported. A history of hypersensitivity to buprenorphine is a contraindication to Buprenex.

In the United Kingdom, buprenorphine hydrochloride was made available under monitored release regulation during the first year of sale, and yielded data from 1,736 physicians on 9,123 patients (17,120 administrations). Data on 240 children under the age of 18 years were included in this monitored release program. No important new adverse effects attributable to buprenorphine hydrochloride were observed.

Drug Abuse And Dependence

Buprenorphine hydrochloride is a partial agonist of the morphine type; i.e., it has certain opioid properties which may lead to psychic dependence of the morphine type due to an opiate-like euphoric component of the drug. Direct dependence studies have shown little physical dependence upon withdrawal of the drug. However, caution should be used in prescribing to individuals who are known to be drug abusers or ex-narcotic addicts. The drug may not substitute in acutely dependent narcotic addicts due to its antagonist component and may induce withdrawal symptoms.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Buprenex (Buprenorphine)

Related Resources for Buprenex

© Buprenex Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Buprenex Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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