Can Eating Eggs Make You Nauseous?

Reviewed on 1/4/2021

Nausea after eating eggs

Some people may experience nausea after eating eggs. If you feel nauseous after eating eggs, you may have an intolerance or allergy to egg yolks, egg whites, or both.
Some people may experience nausea after eating eggs. If you feel nauseous after eating eggs, you may have an intolerance or allergy to egg yolks, egg whites, or both.

Eggs are a rich source of nutrients, making them a popular meal choice and ingredient. However, some people may experience nausea after eating eggs.

If you feel nauseous after eating eggs, you may have an intolerance or allergy to egg yolks, egg whites, or both.

Signs of nausea after eating eggs

Signs of nausea after eating eggs include:

For some people, these symptoms also include diarrhea, headaches, and fogginess. 

If you have an egg allergy, other symptoms may include:

Causes of nausea after eating eggs

Not all foods agree with everyone. You may find that eggs also cause physical symptoms that make you uncomfortable. These can happen for several reasons, including:

Egg allergy

If eating eggs makes you feel nauseous, you may have an egg allergy

Allergies involve the immune system. With an egg allergy, your body recognizes the proteins as foreign, overreacts and produces antibodies. These create egg allergy symptoms include itching, hives, swelling, wheezing, and difficulty breathing. Sometimes even a small amount can cause a serious reaction.

Egg intolerance

An intolerance is different from an allergy. Where an allergy is immune-related, an intolerance is digestive-related. This occurs because your body is unable to break down the food. This may be caused by a lack of enzymes, or sensitivity to ingredients like additives or naturally existing chemicals. 

An egg intolerance won’t produce antibodies, but it may create digestive symptoms like nausea, vomiting, cramping, pain, and diarrhea. Some people with an egg intolerance may be able to eat small amounts of eggs without experiencing any nausea or other symptoms.

Sensitivity to texture and smell

Some people have highly reactive senses. You may experience nausea or gagging from the smell, texture, or taste of an egg. This may not be related to any allergy, intolerance, or other health condition. You may just not like eggs. 

Pregnancy

Some conditions, like pregnancy, are naturally prone to nausea. You may be encouraged to eat foods rich in protein to help, but you may find certain foods like eggs can aggravate your nausea. 

Chemotherapy-induced nausea

Nausea can be a side effect of some treatments like chemotherapy. While bland, soft foods like hard-boiled eggs may improve nausea, they also might make it worse for some people. 

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Tests for nausea after eating eggs

If you experience nausea after eating eggs, your doctor may test for an allergy or intolerance. These tests include:

Skin-prick test

Your doctor will place a small amount of liquid containing egg onto your forearm. This liquid is then poked into the skin with a probe. If your skin develops raised red bumps within 15 to 20 minutes, you may have an egg allergy.

Blood test

Your doctor may test your blood for immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies to egg protein. 

Food elimination

Your doctor may ask you to remove eggs from your diet and then reintroduce them after a time. If you experience nausea or other symptoms after eating eggs again, you may have an allergy or intolerance. 

Food sensitivity tests

Sometimes complementary and alternative health practitioners may request food sensitivity tests, but these tests are controversial and not always reliable.

Treatment for nausea after eating eggs

If you have an intolerance, your doctor may suggest eliminating eggs from your diet. If you haven’t seen a doctor and are eliminating eggs on your own, it’s best to speak to an allergist to rule out an egg allergy.

If you have an egg allergy, the best treatment is to avoid all eggs. Inhaling, touching, or eating even a small amount of egg may cause allergic reaction. If you are only allergic to egg whites or yolks, you should avoid eggs all together as there may still be protein present.

There is no cure for a food allergy, but your doctor may recommend treatments to manage symptoms or treat your immune system. These may include:

In immunotherapies, small amounts of egg are given in increasing amounts until you don’t have a reaction. This must be done under the specialized care of an allergist doctor to avoid harm.

A serious reaction to eggs can be life-threatening. Seek medical attention

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References
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton: "Egg Allergy."

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: "Food Intolerance Versus Food Allergy."

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: "Egg Allergy | Causes, Symptoms & Treatment."

The Quarterly Review of Biology: "Morning Sickness: A Mechanism for Protecting Mother and Embryo."

University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics: "Chemotherapy: What can be done about side effects?"

American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology: "The myth of IgG food panel testing."

Food Allergy Canada: "Living with allergies: Treatments and therapies."

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