Can You Feel the Baby at 13 Weeks?

Reviewed on 2/19/2021

Can you feel the baby at 13 weeks?

The 13th week is the golden second trimester of pregnancy. Although seasoned mommies may feel a baby flutter as early as 13 weeks, first-time moms may not feel their baby move until the 25th week.
The 13th week is the golden second trimester of pregnancy. Although seasoned mommies may feel a baby flutter as early as 13 weeks, first-time moms may not feel their baby move until the 25th week.

You have arrived at the golden second trimester of pregnancy. The nausea is improving, your hair is thicker and you do not need to pee every five minutes. You can sometimes feel a small baby bump (although it is better felt by the 15th week) and most people have started complimenting you on your pregnancy glow.

Your baby is growing quickly in your womb! They are about 0.05 lbs at 13 weeks and about the size of a ripe peach. Your baby (or fetus as doctors call them) is around 7.4 cm long from the head to buttocks. Their eyes are moving into position, their ankles and wrists have formed, they have a big head and the rest of the body is catching up to form the proper shape.

You will mostly start to feel your baby moving around between the 18th and 20th week of your pregnancy. Although seasoned mommies may feel a baby flutter as early as 13 weeks, first-time moms may not feel their baby move until the 25th week.

Baby movement feels like bubbling, tickling, and vibration or even like passing of gas. As the weeks pass, you will start noticing that the baby moves more when you are quiet or resting. Sometimes, your baby moves in response to noises or your emotions. The baby will move if they are uncomfortable in a particular position or if you drink something cold.

There is absolutely no need to worry if you do not feel movement at 13 weeks. You will feel them soon enough, stronger and harder each time. This is the time when the baby’s heart is developed, and you and your partner can hear the baby’s heartbeat through a Doppler ultrasound. If you are concerned because you cannot feel the baby bump at 13 weeks, your obstetrician will perform sonography to ascertain the baby’s intrauterine growth.

What is happening in my body?

Obviously, you will start gaining weight. There is a lot more blood pumping around your uterus and genitals and this sends your sex drive through the roof. Sex during all trimesters of pregnancy is safe unless the doctor advises against it. Your immunity may be compromised in pregnancy, so make sure you stay away from people who are sick, especially those with flu and rashes such as chickenpox or measles. Some women have swollen and painful gums. Use warm water to gargle and a soft brush to keep your teeth clean.

At around 13 weeks, you may experience pain on the side of your belly because of the expanding womb. There may be bloating, constipation and heartburn. Your breasts may be sore. You will have greasier skin with acne, but your hair will be shinier and thicker. Weird cravings such as eating marshmallows with tea are common. Vegans may crave meat. Nausea and vomiting may persist, although the frequency is reduced. Finding desire or time to exercise is not easy, but in the coming weeks, put your fitness first. Go for a walk daily. Try pregnancy yoga under proper guidance. Have a screen-free day and go for a picnic with your partner or friend.

Do’s and don’ts in the second trimester of pregnancy

  • Eat a balanced meal. Avoid sugary drinks and salty food. Drink plenty of water and include nuts and complex carbs such as oats, millets and brown rice in your diet. Lean protein such as chicken, eggs and salmon (fatty fish) is also a good idea. Eat fruit daily. Remember, there is only a slight increase in the caloric requirement during pregnancy therefore, the need to “eat for two” is a misconception.
  • Listen to your body and do not overdo stuff. Get adequate rest. Go for a walk daily. If you want to continue exercise in a gym, talk to your obstetrician first.
  • Avoid medication in any form. Most medications are not safe in pregnancy. Never skip prenatal vitamins that the doctor has prescribed.
  • Avoid saunas, heating blankets and direct heat from a hot tub, especially in the first four months.
  • Visit your obstetrician for regular checkups, blood tests and sonography.
  • Inform your obstetrician if you have pre-existing medical conditions such as thyroid diseasediabeteshigh blood pressureasthma and/or lupus.
  • Do activities that relax you. Read, tend to your garden, bake for your family, meditate and listen to relaxing music.

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References
Medscape Medical Reference

NHS


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