CellCept vs. Prograf

Are CellCept and Prograf the Same Thing?

CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) and Prograf (tacrolimus) are immunosuppressive agents used to prevent the body from rejecting a kidney, liver, or heart transplant.

CellCept is usually given with cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral) and a steroid medication.

Side effects of CellCept and Prograf that are similar include constipation, nausea, headache, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain or upset, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping (insomnia), tremor/shaking, swelling in your hands or feet, and numbness or tingly feeling.

Side effects of CellCept that are different from Prograf include gas, weakness, and anxiety.

Both CellCept and Prograf may interact with antibiotics, antivirals, other medicines that weaken the immune system.

CellCept may also interact with cholestyramine.

Prograf may also interact with chemotherapy, medicines to treat bowel disorder, pain or arthritis medicines, birth control pills or hormone replacement, metoclopramide, mycophenolate, mofetil, sirolimus, St John's wort, lansoprazole, omeprazole, rifampin, rifabutin, potassium supplements, diuretics (water pills), calcium channel blockers, antifungals, HIV medicines, antacids containing magnesium or aluminum, and seizure medicines.

What Are Possible Side Effects of CellCept?

Side effects of CellCept include:

CellCept may cause side effects, including:

  • constipation,
  • nausea,
  • headache,
  • diarrhea,
  • vomiting,
  • stomach pain or upset,
  • loss of appetite,
  • gas,
  • tremor,
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia),
  • weakness,
  • swelling in your hands or feet,
  • numbness or tingly feeling, or
  • anxiety.

Tell your doctor if you experience unlikely but serious side effects of CellCept including:

  • unusual tiredness,
  • fast or irregular heartbeat,
  • muscle weakness,
  • easy bleeding or bruising,
  • swelling of the feet or ankles,
  • mental/mood changes,
  • weakness on one side of the body, or
  • unusual change in the amount of urine.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Prograf?

Common side effects of Prograf include:

  • shaking,
  • headache,
  • diarrhea,
  • constipation,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • upset stomach,
  • stomach pain,
  • loss of appetite,
  • trouble sleeping (insomnia), or
  • tingling or swelling of the hands or feet.

Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Prograf including:

  • mental/mood changes,
  • dizziness,
  • change in the amount of urine,
  • tiredness,
  • pounding heartbeat,
  • hearing problems (such as hearing loss, ringing in the ears),
  • pain/redness/swelling of arms or legs,
  • easy bruising/bleeding,
  • muscle pain/cramps/weakness,
  • yellowing skin or eyes,
  • dark urine,
  • persistent nausea or vomiting, and
  • severe stomach or abdominal pain.

QUESTION

In the U.S., 1 in every 4 deaths is caused by heart disease. See Answer

What Is CellCept?

CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) is an immunosuppressive agent used to prevent your body from rejecting a kidney, liver, or heart transplant. CellCept is usually given with cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral) and a steroid medication.

What Is Prograf?

Prograf (tacrolimus) is an immunosuppressant used together with other medicines to prevent your body from rejecting a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. Some forms of Prograf are available in generic form.

What Drugs Interact With CellCept?

CellCept may interact with cholestyramine, antibiotics, acyclovir, ganciclovir, valacyclovir, or other medicines that weaken the immune system. Tell your doctor all medications you use.

How Should Prograf be Taken?

Dosing of Prograf is individualized based on clinical assessments of rejection and tolerability.

What Drugs Interact With Prograf?

Prograf may interact with chemotherapy, medicines to treat bowel disorder, antiviral medications, pain or arthritis medicines, antibiotics, other medications to prevent organ transplant rejection, birth control pills or hormone replacement, metoclopramide, mycophenolate, mofetil, sirolimus, St John's wort, lansoprazole, omeprazole, rifampin, rifabutin, potassium supplements, diuretics (water pills), calcium channel blockers, antifungals, HIV medicines, antacids containing magnesium or aluminum, or seizure medicine. Many other medicines interact with Prograf. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Prograf should be used only when prescribed. This drug passes into breast milk and the effect on a nursing infant is unknown. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

How Should CellCept be Taken?

The dose of CellCept depends on the type of transplant performed.

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References
Dailymed. CellCept Product Information

https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=23d74606-134c-464c-8323-9cf52bb3c5fa&audience=consumer

Dailymed. Prograf Product Information.
https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=7f667de1-9dfa-4bd6-8ba0-15ee2d78873b&audience=consumer

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