Cleocin vs. BenzaClin

Are Cleocin and BenzaClin the Same Thing?

Cleocin (clindamycin hydrochloride) and BenzaClin (clindamycin - benzoyl peroxide) are both forms of the antibiotic clindamycin used for different purposes.

Cleocin is an oral medication used to treat serious infections caused by bacteria.

BenzaClin Topical Gel is a combination of the antibiotic clindamycin and another antibacterial drug indicated for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Cleocin?

Common side effects of Cleocin include:

Other side effects of Cleocin include:

  • burning,
  • itching,
  • dryness,
  • redness,
  • oily skin,
  • skin peeling, or
  • other irritation of treated skin.

Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Cleocin including:

  • severe redness, itching, or dryness of treat skin areas; or
  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody.

What Are Possible Side Effects of BenzaClin?

Common side effects of BenzaClin include:

  • dry skin,
  • severe skin redness,
  • burning,
  • itching or tingly feeling,
  • skin peeling,
  • irritation, and
  • stinging.

Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of BenzaClin Topical Gel including:

  • severe redness,
  • burning,
  • stinging, or
  • peeling of treated skin areas; or
  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody.

What Is Cleocin?

Cleocin (clindamycin) is an antibiotic used to treat severe acne. Cleocin T is available in generic form.

What Is BenzaClin?

BenzaClin (clindamycin - benzoyl peroxide) Topical Gel is a combination of two antibacterial drugs indicated for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris.

QUESTION

Acne is the result of an allergy. See Answer

What Drugs Interact With Cleocin?

Cleocin may interact with other neuromuscular blocking agents or erythromycin.

What Drugs Interact With BenzaClin?

BenzaClin Topical Gel may interact with erythromycin topical or oral.

How Should Cleocin Be Taken?

Apply a thin film of Cleocin twice daily to affected area. Cleocin T may interact with erythromycin topical or erythromycin taken by mouth. Tell your doctor all medications you are taking. The dose of Cleocin HCl for adults is 150 to 300 mg every 6 hours. For more severe infections is 300 to 450 mg every 6 hours. The dose of for pediatric patients is 8 to 16 mg/kg/day divided in three or four equal doses. For more severe infections, 16 to 20 mg/kg/day divided in three or four equal doses.

How Should BenzaClin Be Taken?

BenzaClin Topical Gel has 10mg clindamycin and 50mg benzoyl peroxide strength per gram of gel. Topical clindamycin is absorbed through the skin surface.

SLIDESHOW

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References

Pfizer. Cleocin T Product Information.
https://www.pfizermedicalinformation.com/en-us/cleocin-t/dosage-admin
DailyMed. BenzaClin Product Information.
https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=4c6b2aca-d940-42af-a068-418f015d277a

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