Cleocin vs. Cipro

Are Cleocin and Cipro the Same Thing?

Cleocin (clindamycin hydrochloride) and Cipro (ciprofloxacin) are antibiotics used to treat infections caused by bacteria.

Cleocin and Cipro belong to different antibiotic drug classes. Cleocin is a lincomycin antibiotic and Cipro is a quinolone antibiotic.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Cleocin?

Common side effects of Cleocin include:

  • burning,
  • itching,
  • dryness,
  • redness,
  • oily skin,
  • skin peeling, or
  • other irritation of treated skin.

Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Cleocin including:

  • severe redness, itching, or dryness of treat skin areas; or
  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Cipro?

Common side effects of Cipro include:

Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Cipro including:

  • severe dizziness,
  • fainting,
  • fast or pounding heartbeats;
  • sudden pain,
  • snapping or popping sound,
  • bruising,
  • swelling,
  • tenderness,
  • stiffness, or loss of movement in any of your joints;
  • watery or bloody diarrhea;
  • confusion,
  • hallucinations,
  • depression,
  • unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • severe headache,
  • ringing in your ears,
  • pain behind your eyes;
  • pale or yellow skin, dark colored urine,
  • fever,
  • weakness;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • easy bruising or bleeding; numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body;
  • the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; or
  • severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat,
  • swelling in your face or tongue,
  • burning in your eyes,
  • skin pain,
  • followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

What is Cleocin?

Cleocin (clindamycin) is an antibiotic used to treat severe acne. Cleocin T is available in generic form.

What is Cipro?

Cipro (ciprofloxacin) is a quinolone antibiotic.

QUESTION

Bowel regularity means a bowel movement every day. See Answer

What Drugs Interact With Cleocin?

Cleocin may interact with other neuromuscular blocking agents or erythromycin.

What Drugs Interact With Cipro?

Cipro may interact with tizanidine, blood thinners, clozapine, cyclosporine, glyburide, methotrexate, metoclopramide, phenytoin, probenecid, ropinirole, theophylline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or steroids.

How Should Cleocin Be Taken?

Apply a thin film of Cleocin T Topical twice daily to affected area. Cleocin T may interact with erythromycin topical or erythromycin taken by mouth. Tell your doctor all medications you are taking. The dose of Cleocin HCl for adults is 150 to 300 mg every 6 hours. For more severe infections is 300 to 450 mg every 6 hours. The dose of for pediatric patients is 8 to 16 mg/kg/day divided in three or four equal doses. For more severe infections, 16 to 20 mg/kg/day divided in three or four equal doses.

How Should Cipro Be Taken?

  • Take Cipro exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • Your healthcare provider will tell you how much Cipro to take and when to take it.
  • Take Cipro Tablets in the morning and evening at about the same time each day. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not split, crush or chew the tablet. Tell your healthcare provider if you cannot swallow the tablet whole.
  • Take Cipro Oral Suspension in the morning and evening at about the same time each day. Shake the Cipro Oral Suspension bottle well each time before use for about 15 seconds to make sure the suspension is mixed well. Close the bottle completely after use.
  • Take Cipro XR one time each day at about the same time each day. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not split, crush or chew the tablet. Tell your healthcare provider if you cannot swallow the tablet whole.
  • Cipro IV is given to you by intravenous (IV) infusion into your vein, slowly, over 60 minutes, as prescribed by your healthcare provider.
  • Cipro can be taken with or without food.
  • Cipro should not be taken with dairy products (like milk or yogurt) or calcium-fortified juices alone, but may be taken with a meal that contains these products.
  • Drink plenty of fluids while taking Cipro.
  • Do not skip any doses of Cipro, or stop taking it, even if you begin to feel better

Taking all of your Cipro doses will help make sure that all of the bacteria are killed. Taking all of your Cipro doses will help lower the chance that the bacteria will become resistant to Cipro. If you become resistant to Cipro, Cipro and other antibacterial medicines may not work for you in the future.

  • If you take too much Cipro, call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away.

SLIDESHOW

Fungal Skin Infections: Types, Symptoms, and Treatments See Slideshow
Disclaimer

All drug information provided on RxList.com is sourced directly from drug monographs published by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Any drug information published on RxList.com regarding general drug information, drug side effects, drug usage, dosage, and more are sourced from the original drug documentation found in its FDA drug monograph.

Drug information found in the drug comparisons published on RxList.com is primarily sourced from the FDA drug information. The drug comparison information found in this article does not contain any data from clinical trials with human participants or animals performed by any of the drug manufacturers comparing the drugs.

The drug comparisons information provided does not cover every potential use, warning, drug interaction, side effect, or adverse or allergic reaction. RxList.com assumes no responsibility for any healthcare administered to a person based on the information found on this site.

As drug information can and will change at any time, RxList.com makes every effort to update its drug information. Due to the time-sensitive nature of drug information, RxList.com makes no guarantees that the information provided is the most current.

Any missing drug warnings or information does not in any way guarantee the safety, effectiveness, or the lack of adverse effects of any drug. The drug information provided is intended for reference only and should not be used as a substitute for medical advice.

If you have specific questions regarding a drug’s safety, side effects, usage, warnings, etc., you should contact your doctor or pharmacist, or refer to the individual drug monograph details found on the FDA.gov or RxList.com websites for more information.

You may also report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA by visiting the FDA MedWatch website or calling 1-800-FDA-1088.

References
Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

SOURCE:

RxList. Cleocin Medication Guide.

https://www.rxlist.com/cleocin-drug.htm#medguide

RxList. Cipro Medication Guide.

https://www.rxlist.com/cipro-drug.htm#medguide

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors