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Vitamin D

Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

Brand Name: Drisdol, Calciferol

Generic Name: vitamin D, cholecalciferol, 1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol, ergocalciferol

Drug Class: Vitamins, Fat-Soluble

What Is Vitamin D and How Does It Work?

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin indicated for use in the treatment of hypoparathyroidism, refractory rickets, also known as vitamin D resistant rickets, and familial hypophosphatemia.

Vitamin D is available under the following different brand names: Drisdol, Calciferol, cholecalciferol, 1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol, and ergocalciferol.

Dosages of Vitamin D Should Be Given As Follows:

Adult and Pediatric Dosage Forms & Strengths

1 mcg = 40 international units (IU)

Oral Solution

  • 8000IU/mL (200mcg/mL)
Capsule
  • 50,000IU (1.25mg)
Tablet
  • 400IU (10mcg)
  • 2000IU (50mcg)

Dosage Considerations

Vitamin D toxicity may last 2 months or more after therapy is discontinued.

Adequate clinical response to vitamin D therapy is dependent on adequate dietary calcium.

In patients with rickets, the range between therapeutic and toxic doses is narrow in vitamin D–resistant patients; adjust dose based on clinical response to avoid toxicity.

Vitamin D as Nutritional Supplementation

Recommended daily allowance (RDA)

19-70 years: 600 IU (15 mcg)/day

Pregnant or lactating women: 600 IU (15 mcg)/day

Vitamin D as Nutritional Supplementation

Recommended daily allowance (RDA)

19-70 years: 600 IU (15 mcg)/day

Pregnant or lactating women: 600 IU (15 mcg)/day

Vitamin D to Prevent and Treat Osteoporosis

>50 years: 800-1000 IU (20-25 mcg) PO once daily with calcium supplements

Vitamin D to Prevent and Treat Hypoparathyroidism

50,000-200,000 IU (0.625-5 mg) PO once daily with calcium supplements

Vitamin D to Prevent and Treat Vitamin D-Resistant Rickets

12,000-500,000 IU (0.3-12.5 mg) PO once daily

Vitamin D to Prevent and Treat Familial Hypophosphatemia

10,000-60,000 IU (0.25-1.5 mg) PO once daily with phosphate supplements

What Are Side Effects Associated with Using Vitamin D?

Common side effects associated with using vitamin D include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What Other Drugs Interact with vitamin D?

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor, health care provider or pharmacist first.

Vitamin D has nown moderate interactions with at least 25 different drugs.

This document does not contain all possible interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the products you use. Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

What Are Warnings and Precautions for vitamin D?

Warnings

This medication contains vitamin D. Do not take Drisdol, Calciferol, cholecalciferol, 1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol, or ergocalciferol if you are allergic to vitamin D or any ingredients contained in this drug.

Keep out of reach of children. In case of overdose, get medical help or contact a Poison Control Center immediately.

Contraindications

Hypercalcemia

Ergocalciferol (oral): Gastrointestinal (GI), liver, or biliary disease associated with malabsorption of vitamin D analogues

Documented hypersensitivity with drugs that could have allergenic cross reactivity with ergocalceferol

Effects of Drug Abuse

None.

Short-Term Effects

None.

Long-Term Effects

None.

Cautions

Ergocalciferol: Use with caution in renal impairment (strong caution), heart disease, kidney stones, arteriosclerosis.

Obtain serum calcium twice weekly during titration.

Discontinue if patient becomes hypercalcemic.

Presence of tartrazine in some products may cause allergic reactions.

Vitamin D toxicity may last >2 months after therapy is discontinued.

Restrict intake in infants with idiopathic hypercalcemia.

Concurrent use of cardiac glycosides.

Adequate clinical response to vitamin D therapy is dependent on adequate dietary calcium.

Maintain normal serum phosphorous concentrations in patients treated for hyperphosphatemia to prevent metastatic calcification.

When treating hypoparathyroidism, concomitant treatment with intravenous calcium, parathyroid hormone, and/or dihydrotachysterol may also be required.

Adults with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m² are at high risk for vitamin D deficiency due to storage of vitamin D in adipose tissue; doses higher than recommended daily allowance may be required, but must be carefully monitored to avoid toxicity.

In renal impairment, supplementation with ergocalciferol may be necessary; monitor closely.

In patients with rickets, the range between therapeutic and toxic doses is narrow in vitamin D–resistant patients; adjust dose based on clinical response to avoid toxicity.

Pregnancy and Lactation

Use vitamin D with caution during pregnancy if benefits outweigh risks. Animal studies show risk and human studies are not available, or neither animal nor human studies done. Vitamin D is distributed into breast milk; use with caution while breastfeeding.

Reviewed on 2/16/2017


SOURCE:
Medscape. Lescol XL. Fluvastatin.
https://reference.medscape.com/drug/lescol-xl-fluvastatin-344417

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