Cortaren

Last updated on RxList: 1/30/2019
Cortaren Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 1/30/2019

Cortaren (dexamethasone sodium phosphate) is a corticosteroid indicated for allergic states, dermatologic diseases, endocrine disorders, gastrointestinal diseases, hematologic disorders, neoplastic diseases, nervous system, ophthalmic diseases, renal diseases, respiratory diseases, and rheumatic disorders. Common side effects of Cortaren include:

The initial dosage of Cortaren injection varies from 0.5 to 9 mg a day depending on the disease being treated. Cortaren may interact with aspirin, phenytoin, phenobarbital, ephedrine, rifampin, anticoagulants, or potassium-depleting diuretics. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using Cortaren; it is unknown how it would affect a fetus. Corticosteroids such as pass into breast milk and could cause unwanted effects in a nursing infant. Breastfeeding while using Cortaren is not recommended. Following prolonged therapy, withdrawal of Cortaren may result in symptoms of corticosteroid withdrawal syndrome including fever, muscle or joint pain, and feeling unwell (malaise).

Our Cortaren (dexamethasone sodium phosphate) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

SLIDESHOW

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)? Symptoms, Treatment, Diagnosis See Slideshow
Cortaren Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

Fluid And Electrolyte Disturbances

Sodium retention
Fluid retention
Congestive heart failure in susceptible patients
Potassium loss
Hypokalemic alkalosis
Hypertension

Musculoskeletal

Muscle weakness
Steroid myopathy
Loss of muscle mass
Osteoporosis
Pathologic fracture of long bones
Vertebral compression fractures
Aseptic necrosis of femoral and humeral heads
Tendon rupture

Gastrointestinal

Peptic ulcer with possible subsequent perforation and hemorrhage
Perforation of the small and large bowel, particularly in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Pancreatitis
Abdominal distention
Ulcerative esophagitis

Dermatologic

Impaired wound healing
Thin fragile skin
Petechiae and ecchymoses
Erythema
Increased sweating
May suppress reactions to skin tests
Burning or tingling, especially in the perineal area (after IV injection)
Other cutaneous reactions, such as allergic dermatitis, urticaria, angioneurotic edema

Neurologic

Convulsions
Increased intracranial pressure with papilledema (pseudotumor cerebri) usually after treatment
Vertigo
Headache
Psychic disturbances

Endocrine

Menstrual irregularities
Development of cushingoid state
Suppression of growth in children
Secondary adrenocortical and pituitary unresponsiveness, particularly in times of stress, as in trauma, surgery, or illness
Decreased carbohydrate tolerance
Manifestations of latent diabetes mellitus
Increased requirements for insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents in diabetics
Hirsutism

Ophthalmic

Posterior subcapsular cataracts
Increased intraocular pressure
Glaucoma
Exophthalmos

Metabolic

Negative nitrogen balance due to protein catabolism

Cardiovascular

Myocardial rupture following recent myocardial infarction (see WARNINGS)

Other

Anaphylactoid or hypersensitivity reactions
Thromboembolism
Weight gain
Increased appetite
Nausea
Malaise
Hiccups

The following additional adverse reactions are related to parenteral corticosteroid therapy:

Rare instances of blindness associated with intralesional therapy around the face and head
Hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation
Subcutaneous and cutaneous atrophy
Sterile abscess
Post-injection flare (following intra-articular use)
Charcot-like arthropathy

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Cortaren (Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Injection)

QUESTION

The term arthritis refers to stiffness in the joints. See Answer

© Cortaren Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and Cortaren Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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