How Do Decarboxylase Inhibitors Work?

Reviewed on 1/12/2022

HOW DO DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS WORK?

Decarboxylase inhibitors are a class of medications used to treat symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

The direct cause of Parkinson's disease or Parkinsonian-like syndrome is the deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. Antiparkinson medications aim to prolong the action of dopamine in the brain by:

  • Replacing dopamine
  • Inhibiting dopamine breakdown
  • Sensitizing dopamine receptors to stimulate dopamine release

Decarboxylase is an enzyme that initiates the breakdown of levodopa after exerting its effect. Decarboxylase inhibitors block the action of decarboxylase, thereby preventing the breakdown of levodopa, which in turn, increases the availability of levodopa at the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing a lower dose of levodopa. Levodopa gets converted into dopamine in the brain and restores the depleted dopamine levels.

HOW ARE DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS USED?

Decarboxylase inhibitors can be used alone or as a combination with other drugs to treat Parkinson's disease and its symptoms.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS?

Some of the side effects of decarboxylase inhibitors include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

SLIDESHOW

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WHAT ARE NAMES OF DECARBOXYLASE INHIBITORS?

Generic and brand names of decarboxylase inhibitors include:

References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/decarboxylase-inhibitors

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