Crisaborole Topical

Reviewed on 8/1/2022

What Is Crisaborole Topical and How Does It Work?

Crisaborole Topical is a prescription medication used to treat the symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis

  • Crisaborole Topical is available under the following different brand names: Eucrisa

What Are Side Effects Associated with Using Crisaborole Topical?

Common side effects of Crisaborole Topical include:

  • application site pain

Serious side effects of Crisaborole Topical include:

  • hives,
  • itching,
  • swelling,
  • redness,
  • severe dizziness, and
  • trouble breathing

Rare side effects of Crisaborole Topical include:

  • none

Seek medical care or call 911 at once if you have the following serious side effects:

  • Severe headache, confusion, slurred speech, arm or leg weakness, trouble walking, loss of coordination, feeling unsteady, very stiff muscles, high fever, profuse sweating, or tremors;
  • Serious eye symptoms such as sudden vision loss, blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain or swelling, or seeing halos around lights;
  • Serious heart symptoms such as fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeats; fluttering in the chest; shortness of breath; sudden dizziness, lightheartedness, or passing out.

This is not a complete list of side effects and other serious side effects or health problems that may occur because of the use of this drug. Call your doctor for medical advice about serious side effects or adverse reactions. You may report side effects or health problems to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What Are Dosages of Crisaborole Topical?

Adult and pediatric dosage

Topical ointment

  • 2 %

Atopic Dermatitis

Adult dosage

  • Apply a thin layer Topically to the affected area(s) Two times a day

Pediatric dosage

  • Children below 3 months: Safety and efficacy not established
  • Children above 3 months: Apply a thin layer Topically to the affected area(s) Two times a day

Dosage Considerations – Should be Given as Follows: 

  • See “Dosages”

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What Other Drugs Interact with Crisaborole Topical?

If your medical doctor is using this medicine to treat your pain, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of any possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor, health care provider, or pharmacist first.

  • Crisaborole Topical has no noted severe interactions with any other drugs.
  • Crisaborole Topical has no noted serious interactions with any other drugs.
  • Crisaborole Topical has no noted moderate interactions with any other drugs.
  • Crisaborole Topical has no noted minor interactions with any other drugs.

This information does not contain all possible interactions or adverse effects. Visit the RxList Drug Interaction Checker for any drug interactions. Therefore, before using this product, tell your doctor or pharmacist about all your products. Keep a list of all your medications with you and share this information with your doctor and pharmacist. Check with your health care professional or doctor for additional medical advice, or if you have health questions or concerns.

What Are Warnings and Precautions for Crisaborole Topical?

Contraindications

  • History of hypersensitivity to Crisaborole or any component of the formulation 

Effects of drug abuse

  • None

Short-Term Effects

  • See “What Are Side Effects Associated with Using Crisaborole Topical?”

Long-Term Effects

  • See “What Are Side Effects Associated with Using Crisaborole Topical?”

Cautions

  • Hypersensitivity reactions were reported, including contact urticaria; signs and symptoms may include severe pruritus, swelling, and erythema at the application site or a distant site; discontinue immediately and initiate appropriate therapy if hypersensitivity is suspected (see Contraindications)

Pregnancy and Lactation

  • There are no available data on pregnant women to inform the drug-associated risk for major birth defects and miscarriage
  • Crisaborole is systemically absorbed
  • Lactation
    • Unknown if distributed in human breast milk
    • Crisaborole is systemically absorbed
    • Consider the developmental and health benefits of breastfeeding along with the mother’s clinical need for the drug, and any potential adverse effects on the breastfed infant from the drug or the underlying maternal condition.
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drug/eucrisa-crisaborole-Topical-1000106#0

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