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Flagyl vs. Cipro

Are Flagyl and Cipro the Same Thing?

Flagyl, Flagyl ER, and Flagyl Injection (metronidazole) and Cipro (ciprofloxacin) are antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections.

Flagyl and Cipro are different types of antibiotics. Flagyl is a nitroimidazole antibiotic and Cipro is a quinolone antibiotic.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Flagyl?

Side effects of Flagyl include:

Uncomfortable side effects that may become serious are:

  • fevers,
  • pain with urination,
  • mouth sores,
  • tingling or pricking sensations that may become permanent,
  • brain disease, and
  • seizures.

Serious but unlikely side effects of Flagyl include:

What Are Possible Side Effects of Cipro?

Common side effects of Cipro include:

Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Cipro including severe dizziness, fainting, fast or pounding heartbeats; sudden pain, snapping or popping sound, bruising, swelling, tenderness, stiffness, or loss of movement in any of your joints; watery or bloody diarrhea; confusion, hallucinations, depression, unusual thoughts or behavior; seizure (convulsions); severe headache, ringing in your ears, pain behind your eyes; pale or yellow skin, dark colored urine, fever, weakness; urinating less than usual or not at all; easy bruising or bleeding; numbness, tingling, or unusual pain anywhere in your body; the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild; or severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

What is Flagyl?

Flagyl, Flagyl ER, and Flagyl Injection (metronidazole) are antimicrobial drugs used to treat bacterial vaginosis, trichomonas, amebiasis, and anaerobic bacterial infections.

What is Cipro?

What is Cipro?

Cipro (ciprofloxacin) is a quinolone antibiotic. Cipro is available as a generic drug and is prescribed to treat infections of the skin, lungs, airways, bones, joints, and urinary tract infections caused by susceptible bacteria.

QUESTION

Bowel regularity means a bowel movement every day. See Answer

What Drugs Interact With Flagyl?

Flagyl may interact with blood thinners or seizure medications.

Flagyl may also interact with cimetidine, lithium, or disulfiram.

What Drugs Interact With Cipro?

Cipro may also interact with tizanidine, clozapine, cyclosporine, glyburide, methotrexate, metoclopramide, phenytoin, probenecid, ropinirole, theophylline, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or steroids.

How Should Flagyl Be Taken?

Flagyl is supplied in 250 and 500 mg strength tablets, Flagyl ER is available in 750 mg strength tablets, and Flagyl Injection in 500 mg strength in a buffered 100 ml vial. Dosage is quite variable and dependent upon the severity of disease and other considerations made by the treating physician. Most of the serious side effects may occur with any of these three preparations of Flagyl. Flagyl may cause liver enzyme levels to increase; lithium and creatinine levels should be checked to avoid lithium toxicity or renal compromise. Alcohol may increase the side effects of Flagyl. Patients on disulfiram should not take Flagyl until they have had a two week interval without taking disulfiram, especially alcoholic patients, to avoid psychotic reactions. Treatment in pregnant women (during first 3 months is not advised) or women who are breastfeeding should only be done if the benefits outweigh the potential problems. Flagyl passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Except for use in amebiasis, studies in pediatric patients are not available; Flagyl ER has no pediatric studies.

How Should Cipro Be Taken?

  • Take Cipro exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it.
  • Your healthcare provider will tell you how much Cipro to take and when to take it.
  • Take Cipro Tablets in the morning and evening at about the same time each day. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not split, crush or chew the tablet. Tell your healthcare provider if you cannot swallow the tablet whole.
  • Take Cipro Oral Suspension in the morning and evening at about the same time each day. Shake the Cipro Oral Suspension bottle well each time before use for about 15 seconds to make sure the suspension is mixed well. Close the bottle completely after use.
  • Take Cipro XR one time each day at about the same time each day. Swallow the tablet whole. Do not split, crush or chew the tablet. Tell your healthcare provider if you cannot swallow the tablet whole.
  • Cipro IV is given to you by intravenous (IV) infusion into your vein, slowly, over 60 minutes, as prescribed by your healthcare provider.
  • Cipro can be taken with or without food.
  • Cipro should not be taken with dairy products (like milk or yogurt) or calcium-fortified juices alone, but may be taken with a meal that contains these products.
  • Drink plenty of fluids while taking Cipro.
  • Do not skip any doses of Cipro, or stop taking it, even if you begin to feel better, until you finish your prescribed treatment unless:
    • you have tendon problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about Cipro?”
    • you have nerve problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about Cipro?”
    • you have central nervous system problems. See “What is the most important information I should know about Cipro?”
    • you have a serious allergic reaction. See “What are the possible side effects of Cipro?”
    • your healthcare provider tells you to stop taking Cipro
  • Taking all of your Cipro doses will help make sure that all of the bacteria are killed. Taking all of your Cipro doses will help lower the chance that the bacteria will become resistant to Cipro. If you become resistant to Cipro, Cipro and other antibacterial medicines may not work for you in the future.

  • If you take too much Cipro, call your healthcare provider or get medical help right away.

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References
Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

SOURCE:

RxList. Flagyl Medication Guide.

https://www.rxlist.com/flagyl-drug.htm#medguide

RxList. Cipro Medication Guide.

https://www.rxlist.com/cipro-drug.htm#medguide
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