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Fosamax vs. Boniva

Medical and Pharmacy Editor:

Are Fosamax and Boniva the Same Thing?

Fosamax (alendronate sodium) and Boniva (ibandronate) are bisphosphonates that alter the cycle of bone formation and breakdown in the body used to treat and prevent osteoporosis.

Fosamax is also used to treat Paget's disease.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Fosamax?

Common side effects of Fosamax include:

  • gas,
  • constipation,
  • heartburn,
  • diarrhea,
  • bloating,
  • nausea,
  • vomiting,
  • stomach pain,
  • joint pain or swelling,
  • swelling in your hands or feet,
  • dizziness,
  • headache,
  • eye pain,
  • back pain, or
  • weakness.

Serious side effects of Fosamax include:

  • severe pain (joints, bone, muscle, jaw, back or heartburn),
  • chest pain,
  • difficulty swallowing,
  • bloody stools,
  • eye pain,
  • skin blisters, and
  • swelling of the face, tongue, or throat.

What Are Possible Side Effects of Boniva?

Common side effects of Boniva include:

  • back pain,
  • headache,
  • redness or swelling of your eyes,
  • diarrhea,
  • flu-like symptoms,
  • nausea or stomach upset,
  • pain in your arms or legs,
  • redness or swelling where Boniva was injected,
  • weakness,
  • allergic reaction,
  • indigestion,
  • vomiting,
  • joint pain,
  • dizziness,
  • spinning sensation (vertigo),
  • upper respiratory infection,
  • pneumonia, or
  • urinary tract infection.

What is Fosamax?

Fosamax (alendronate sodium) is a bisphosphonate that is a specific inhibitor of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption used to both treat and prevent osteoporosis, and to treat Paget's disease.

What is Boniva?

Boniva (ibandronate) is a bisphosphonate drug that alters the cycle of bone formation and breakdown in the body used to treat or prevent osteoporosis in women after menopause. Boniva slows bone loss while increasing bone mass, which may prevent bone fractures.

What Drugs Interact With Fosamax?

Fosamax may interact with aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

What Drugs Interact With Boniva?

Boniva may interact with aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

Boniva may also interact with products containing calcium, aluminum, magnesium, or iron (such as antacids, supplements or vitamins).

How Should Fosamax Be Taken?

Fosamax is available in a tablet or oral liquid form. Each bottle of the oral solution contains 91.35 mg of alendronate monosodium salt trihydrate, which is the molar equivalent to 70 mg of the drug. The recommended initial dosage is one 70 mg molar equivalent tablet or oral liquid bottle once weekly or one 10 mg molar equivalent tablet per day. Fosamax must be taken at least one-half hour before the first food, beverage, or medication of the day with plain water only to avoid any reduction in gastrointestinal adsorption.

How Should Boniva Be Taken?

The dose of Boniva is one 150 mg tablet taken once monthly on the same date each month.

Reviewed on 7/9/2018

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP SOURCE:

FDA. Fosamax Medication Guide.

https://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM241519.pdf

Boniva Product Information.

https://www.gene.com/download/pdf/boniva_tablets_prescribing.pdf

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