FreAmine

Last updated on RxList: 5/8/2019
FreAmine Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Last reviewed on RxList 5/8/2019

FreAmine III (amino acid injection) is an amino acid solution indicated to prevent nitrogen loss or treat negative nitrogen balance in adults and pediatric patients where the alimentary tract, by the oral, gastrostomy, or jejunostomy route, cannot or should not be used, or adequate protein intake is not feasible by these routes; gastrointestinal absorption of protein is impaired; or protein requirements are substantially increased as with extensive burns. Common side effects of FreAmine III include:

  • flushing,
  • fever,
  • nausea,
  • injection site reactions (infection, warm sensation, redness, vein inflammation, blood clots, leakage of fluid), and
  • excess fluid in the blood

The total daily dose of FreAmine III depends on daily protein requirements and on the patient's metabolic and clinical response. Daily amino acid doses of approximately 1.5 g/kg of body weight for adults and 2 to 3 g/kg of body weight for infants with adequate calories are generally sufficient to satisfy protein needs and promote positive nitrogen balance. FreAmine III may interact with other drugs. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using FreAmine III; it is unknown how it would affect a fetus. It is unknown if FreAmine III passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our FreAmine III (amino acid injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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FreAmine Professional Information

SIDE EFFECTS

See WARNINGS” and “Special Precautions for Central Venous Nutrition.”

Reactions which may occur because of the solution or the technique of administration include febrile response, infection at the site of injection, venous thrombosis or phlebitis extending from the site of injection, extravasation and hypervolemia.

Local reactions of the infusion site, consisting of a warm sensation, erythema, phlebitis and thrombosis, have been reported with peripheral amino acid infusions, especially if other substances are also administered through the same site.

Generalized flushing, fever and nausea have been reported during peripheral administration of amino acids.

Symptoms may result from an excess or deficit of one or more of the ions present in the solution; therefore, frequent monitoring of electrolyte levels is essential.

If electrolyte supplementation is required during peripheral infusion, it is recommended that additives be administered throughout the day in order to avoid possible venous irritation. Irritating additive medications may require injection at another site and should not be added directly to the amino acid infusate.

Phosphorus deficiency may lead to impaired tissue oxygenation and acute hemolytic anemia. Relative to calcium, excessive phosphorus intake can precipitate hypocalcemia with cramps, tetany and muscular hyperexcitability.

If an adverse reaction does occur, discontinue the infusion, evaluate the patient, institute appropriate therapeutic countermeasures and save the remainder of the fluid for examination if deemed necessary.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for FreAmine (Amino Acid Injection)

SLIDESHOW

Digestive Disorders: Common Misconceptions See Slideshow

© FreAmine Patient Information is supplied by Cerner Multum, Inc. and FreAmine Consumer information is supplied by First Databank, Inc., used under license and subject to their respective copyrights.

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