How Do Adjunct Antiparkinson Agents Work?

Reviewed on 8/9/2021

HOW DO ADJUNCT ANTIPARKINSON AGENTS WORK?

Adjunct antiparkinson agents are indicated as add-on therapy in people with Parkinson's disease who are already on levodopa and carbidopa.

Adjunct therapy treats the symptoms of Parkinson's disease by blocking an enzyme called monoamine oxidase-type B (MAO-B). MAO-B breaks down several chemicals in the brain including dopamine. By blocking MAO-B, the drugs prevent the breakdown of dopamine, resulting in the prolonged action of dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is essential to improve the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

HOW ARE ADJUNCT ANTIPARKINSON AGENTS USED?

Adjunct antiparkinson agents are indicated as add-on therapy in people with Parkinson's disease who are already on other antiparkinson drugs like levodopa and carbidopa.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF ADJUNCT ANTIPARKINSON AGENTS?

Some of the common side effects of adjunct antiparkinson agents include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF ADJUNCT ANTIPARKINSON AGENTS?

Generic and brand names of adjunct antiparkinson agents include:

QUESTION

Parkinson's disease is only seen in people of advanced age. See Answer
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/antiparkinson-agents-adjunct

https://www.parkinson.org/Understanding-Parkinsons/Treatment/Prescription-Medications/MAO-B-Inhibitors

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