How Do Alkalinizing Agents Work?

Reviewed on 5/10/2021

WHAT ARE ALKALINIZING AGENTS AND HOW DO THEY WORK?

Alkalinizing agents are a class of drugs that work by raising the pH in the blood or urine. To understand the drug action in detail, it is essential to know about acidosis. The kidney is an organ that maintains the acid-base balance in the body by removing and filtering acid from the blood and through the urine. When the kidney fails to remove the circulating acids from the blood, it causes a buildup of acid. As a result, there is an imbalance between acid and base in the blood leading to a condition known as metabolic acidosis.

Alkalinizing agents after absorption into the blood break down to produce bicarbonate, which is used to alkalinize or buffer excess acid in the blood by raising its pH. The higher the pH, the more alkaline is the blood. Some alkalinizing agents may also alkalinize urine by promoting excretion of free base and acid from the urine.

HOW ARE ALKALINIZING AGENTS USED?

Alkalinizing agents are either administered intravenously or taken orally. They are mainly used to treat metabolic acidosis. Other uses include:

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF ALKALINIZING AGENTS?

Some of the side effects of alkalinizing agents include:

Some of the common side effects of all alkalinizing agents include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

SLIDESHOW

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WHAT ARE DRUG NAMES OF ALDOSTERONE ANTAGONISTS?

Drug names include:

References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/alkalinizing-agents

https://www.rxlist.com/sodium-bicarbonate-drug.htm#description

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