How Do HIF Stabilizers Work?

Reviewed on 8/4/2021

HOW DO HIF STABILIZERS WORK?

Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizers are a class of medications that have their approval pending from the FDA. They are mainly used for treating anemia caused due to chronic kidney disease in both nondialysis-dependent and dialysis-dependent people.

HIF stabilizers promote the production of RBCs (erythropoiesis) by increasing the hormone erythropoietin. Erythropoietin is produced primarily by the kidneys in response to the low oxygen level in the blood. Thus, HIF stabilizers improve iron availability to the cells. High levels of hepcidin block intestinal iron absorption and cause iron-restricted erythropoiesis and anemia. HIF stabilizers also lower hepcidin levels in the body.

HOW ARE HIF STABILIZERS USED?

HIF stabilizers are useful for treating anemia caused due to chronic kidney disease in both nondialysis-dependent and dialysis-dependent people.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF HIF STABILIZERS?

As HIF stabilizer is still in clinical trials, no adverse effects have been reported.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF HIF STABILIZERS?

Generic and brand name of HIF stabilizer includes:

  • Roxadustat (pending FDA approval)

SLIDESHOW

Kidney Stones: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment See Slideshow
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/hif-stabilizers

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