How Do HIV Entry Inhibitors Work?

Reviewed on 10/22/2021

HOW DO HIV ENTRY INHIBITORS WORK?

HIV entry inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs mainly indicated for the treatment of HIV infection.

The CD4+T cells of the immune system of humans are the target areas for HIV. Once the glycoprotein subunit present on the surface of HIV binds to the CD4+T cells, it then binds to coreceptors like CCR5 or CXCR4. Finally, the viral cells fuse with the human cells to allow their entry into human cells.

HIV entry inhibitors bind to a specific domain of CD4 cells, thereby blocking HIV from infecting the CD4+ cells. They also prevent the further steps of viral attachment and entry into the human cells. Due to the binding specificity of HIV entry inhibitors, they block the viral entry into host cells without suppressing their immune system.

HOW ARE HIV ENTRY INHIBITORS USED?

HIV entry inhibitors, when used in combination with other anti-HIV drugs, are effective against multidrug-resistant HIV infection.

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF HIV ENTRY INHIBITORS?

HIV entry inhibitors can cause some of these side effects, which include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF HIV ENTRY INHIBITORS?

Generic and brand names of HIV entry inhibitors include:

SLIDESHOW

A Timeline of the HIV/AIDS Pandemic See Slideshow
References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/hiv-entry-inhibitors

https://academic.oup.com/jac/article/57/4/619/669426

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors