How Do Hypoglycemia Antidotes Work?

Reviewed on 7/6/2021

HOW DO HYPOGLYCEMIA ANTIDOTES WORK?

Hypoglycemia antidotes are drugs used to treat severe hypoglycemic reactions in people with an insulin overdose. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs in people with diabetes when the sugar (glucose) level drops below what the body needs to function normally.

The pancreas produces the hormone glucagon which increases blood glucose levels by inhibiting glycogen synthesis and promoting the formation of glucose from proteins or fats (gluconeogenesis). Glucagon also increases the breakdown of glycogen into glucose in the liver (glycogenolysis).

Hypoglycemia antidotes promote glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in the liver, causing an increase in blood glucose levels.

HOW ARE HYPOGLYCEMIA ANTIDOTES USED?

Hypoglycemia antidotes are used to treat severe hypoglycemic reactions. Other uses include:

WHAT ARE SIDE EFFECTS OF HYPOGLYCEMIA ANTIDOTES?

Side effects of hypoglycemia antidotes include:

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible side effects, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. Check with your doctor or pharmacist to make sure these drugs do not cause any harm when you take them along with other medicines. Never stop taking your medication and never change your dose or frequency without consulting your doctor.

WHAT ARE NAMES OF HYPOGLYCEMIA ANTIDOTES?

Generic and brand names of hypoglycemia antidotes include:

QUESTION

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References
https://reference.medscape.com/drugs/hypoglycemia-antidotes

https://www.medscape.com/answers/117739-52471/which-medications-in-the-drug-class-hypoglycemia-antidotes-are-used-in-the-treatment-of-type-1-diabetes-mellitus

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